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Under Armour Project Rock 6 Review | Worth the Price?

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The Under Armour Project Rock 6 has received a lot of hype behind its debut. Now in its sixth iteration, the Project Rock shoe line has continued to evolve with the PR 6 being the most technical model to date.

I thought the UA PR 5 did a good job when it comes to being well-rounded in the gym so I was interested in how the 6 would compare. There have been a lot of updates to the 6 compared to its 5 Project Rock predecessors.

UA Project Rock 6 Summary

The UA Project Rock 6 is the most “built out” variation to date. This shoe features more construction updates and details than any Project Rock shoe yet which I see as a good thing.

I think if you’re a fan of the Project Rock line, then you’ll enjoy and approach the PR 6 and what it brings to the table. The reworked upper and more structured midsole gives this shoe a “solid” feeling when training.

For recreational lifters and athletes who love sturdier and more supportive training shoes, I think you’ll resonate with the PR 6. This won’t be a shoe for everyone as the weight and bulkiness come at a cost to flexibility and breathability. More on this below.

Project Rock 6 Pros

  1. The UA Clone upper in this shoe hugs the feet well and it gives this model a wider “feeling” which I think a lot of lifters will enjoy.
  2. The UA HOVR midsole is stable enough for heavier training while remaining responsive for short runs, jumping, and casual wear.
  3. This model is an iteration that I think will really resonate with Project Rock lovers. I could see this shoe being the “best one yet” for many.

Project Rock 6 Cons

  1. There’s a lot going on with this shoe and if you love simplicity then I think you’ll want to pass on this model. Compared to something like the PR 2, this shoe feels super built out.
  2. The thicker midsole gives this model a pretty clunky and anchor-like feeling on the feet. I don’t love these for sprints and advanced plyos.
  3. Despite “feeling” wider this shoe still has a pretty tapered toe box and if you have wide feet, I’d skip these.

Project Rock 6 Specs

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6mm
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Width: Medium

UA Project Rock 6

$160

UA Project Rock 6 Product Shot
4.2
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.2
Durability
4.2
Quality
4.3

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • Light Running (1-3 miles)
  • Thicker Midsole Lovers

Falls Short

  • For Budget Shoppers
  • For Minimalist Lovers
  • For Deadlifts

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Who Should Buy the UA Project Rock 6?

Over the course of my testing with the UA Project Rock 6, I’ve found a few settings where I think the UA Project Rock 6 makes sense.

1. You Want a Shoe for a Little Bit of Everything

The first context where I think the UA Project Rock 6 makes sense is for the generalist in the gym. If you like to do a little bit of everything on a weekly basis and you’re not super specific with your training then this model should work well for you.

The HOVR midsole in this shoe gives them a nice bounce for versatile gym sessions where you’re doing things like jump rope, box jumps, and short runs, and it’s stable enough to support deadlifts over 450 lbs.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 Lifting Review

The grippier outsole is also great for lifters that vary the surfaces they’re training on. I regularly rotate through rubber gym floors, wooden platforms, and turf in single sessions and this model’s grip was stellar for that.

The UA Clone upper is also a nice addition to this shoe for the generalist as it gives this model a more comfortable fit for daily wear which adds to the range in which you can wear this shoe.

2. You’re a Fan of the Project Rock Shoe Line

Another context where the UA Project Rock 6 makes sense to invest in is if you’re a diehard fan of the Project Rock shoe line. This point may seem like a no-brainer, however, with this shoe’s higher price point I’ve had multiple PR fans ask if they’re worth it.

Under Armour Project Rock 6

To date, I feel like the UA Project Rock 6 is one of the stronger models in this shoe line and if you’re someone who was on the fence of skipping a model I don’t think this would be a good one to skip. A model to skip would have been the UA Project Rock 3.

If you are on the fence still, you may want to wait until these go on sale if the higher price point is a major turnoff with this shoe. At $160 USD, this model is far from cost-efficient.

3. You Like a Thicker and Wider Sole for Training

While a thicker sole and base to train on isn’t everyone’s thing, I think this shoe will deliver for that training ask. For example, if you love a wider midsole and a lot of “beef” under the feet when training then this shoe should resonate with you.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 Review

For example, I think heavier set lifters and athletes will enjoy this because this model gives a very anchored feeling when training due to its heavier and thicker midsole and outsole construction.

Who Shouldn’t Buy the UA Project Rock 6?

While I think the UA Project Rock 6 is one of the stronger iterations to date, there are a few contexts where I think you’ll want to pass on this model.

1. You Don’t Love Bulky Training Shoes

My biggest complaint about the UA Project Rock 6 is how bulky and heavy it can feel. If you’re a fan of minimalist shoes or like more articulation in your trainers, these will not be for you.

This model can feel a little “anchor-y” on the feet when sprinting, doing advanced plyometrics, and agility work. Don’t get me wrong, they work for those training verticals, but the heaviness of them is definitely noticeable.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 Midsole and Stack Height

On top of this, the thicker stack height of this shoe can be a knock on their performance for movements like deadlifts where you want to get close to the ground to cut down on the range of motion you’re working through.

All that said, the UA Project Rock 6 feels like one of the bulkiest models to date and if you’ve been drifting away from enjoying that part of this shoe line then you’ll likely find the 6 to be “too much” which is kind of where I’ve landed with these.

2. You Need a Training Shoe for Wide Feet

The UA Project Rock 6 is interesting because it “feels” wider than prior iterations but it’s not actually that much wider regarding its sole construction and forefoot width.

This shoe has a fairly aggressive toe box taper just like past iterations and if you’re regularly fighting toe boxes, especially in the Project Rock line and in your other training shoes, then I think you’ll want to pass on this model.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 for wide feet

For EE-width feet or wider, I’d pass on this model and look into shoes that have better widths for your needs. For example, the Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 has a more wide and anatomical toe box.

3. You Want a Training Shoe for Serious Barbell Training

This context is interesting because the UA Project Rock 6 can work for heavy barbell work, don’t get me wrong, but it’s not my favorite training shoe for doing so.

I think if you’re a lifter that builds their programs around back squats and deadlifts, you may want to explore other models. For example, I’d explore the Haze Trainer, Metcon 9, Dropset Trainer 2, or TriBase Reign 5 if you want a cross-training shoe for these performance asks.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Deadlifts

The UA Project Rock 6’s stack height and thickness can cut into optimizing deadlift performance and their toe box width and lack of articulation takes away from ground feedback.

Quick Take: The UA Project Rock 6 somewhat feels overengineered and I think that will be hit or miss for lifters. If you love Project Rock shoes and the direction this shoe line has taken then you’ll really resonate with this model, in my opinion.

Performance Assessment

To break down the performance of the UA Project Rock 6, I’ll discuss how this shoe performs in a few training verticals. I’ll discuss this shoe’s performance for lifting, versatile training, short runs, and daily wear.

Testing the UA Project Rock 6 for Lifting

In the context of lifting, the UA Project Rock 6 has a pretty standard performance for recreational lifting sessions. I see this shoe as being a good fit for the individual that likes mixing machines with free weight work and goes moderately heavy.

The UA HOVR midsole in this model is dense enough to support things like 455 lbs and heavier leg presses and hack squats. I also like how well the outsole grips different surfaces.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Lifting

The TriBase outsole tech is also nice for promoting a more stable base when training. I feel like the TriBase tech in this model gives them a more grounded feel in the context of surface area and I like that there isn’t an excessive amount of toe spring in these.

My main complaint with this shoe for lifting is how thick its midsole is. This model has a pretty high stack height for a training shoe and for things like deadlifts and lower body movement where you want more ground feel I could see this being an issue.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Strength Training

If you’re someone that loves a lot of ground feedback then I think you’ll find that lacking in this shoe. I also think the toe box could be problematic for those with wider feet when it comes to full toe splay.

Testing the UA Project Rock 6 for Versatile Training

When it comes to versatile training including things like cross-training, HIIT, and athletic-style workouts, the UA Project Rock 6 does an okay job. This isn’t my favorite training shoe for versatile training, but it also wasn’t a poor performance by any means.

I like the upper construction of this shoe, and I like how it locks down the foot when doing multi-directional work. For box jumps and lateral jumps, this shoe has done a good job.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Cross-Training

The outsole tread in this shoe is also great for gripping different surfaces. For example, if you’re regularly doing sled pushes or kettlebell work on turf and having slip issues then I think you’ll be happy with the performance of this shoe’s tread pattern.

As you get more serious with your versatile training, I think that’s when you’ll start to notice their heaviness. For example, when using these for sprints, I noticed their chunky feeling and these weren’t my favorite shoes for broad jumps.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Versatile Training

Overall, I think if you go into this shoe understanding that they’re a heavy model then you’ll be more likely to enjoy them. I also think current Project Rock fans will like this model in this vertical as it’s one of the stronger-performing models to date, in my opinion.

Testing the UA Project Rock 6 for Short Runs and Daily Wear

For short runs, the UA Project Rock 6 should work fine if you’re keeping your mileage below 1-2 miles and using them for 3 miles tops. The HOVR midsole should feel fairly responsive and comfortable for this mileage use.

When it comes to longer runs, I’d pass on this shoe because it can feel heavy and I think as fatigue starts to set in with longer mileages the clunkiness of this shoe can be a major deterrent.

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 for Walking

In the context of daily wear, the UA Project Rock 6 works pretty well. I found the upper to be fairly comfortable and I like how it hugs the foot as it gives this shoe a nice fit for prolonged use.

I also like the full rubber outsole in the context of grip and durability. If you’ve traditionally worn your Project Rock shoes for day-to-day occasions then I think you’ll get a lot out of this model well.

UA Project Rock 6 Sizing

For the UA Project Rock 6, I think most individuals should be safe going true to size in this model. This model’s length fits true to size and the width is what I would describe as medium or regular.

One interesting aspect of this shoe’s fit is that it ” feels” wider due to the UA Clone upper, so I think it will for most. However, the toe box still has an aggressive taper, and I would go as far as to call it “wide.”

Testing the Under Armour Project Rock 6 Sizing

If you currently wear Under Armour training shoes or have bought a Project Rock shoe before, then you’ll want to stay with the same size in this model that you’re used to.

If you have flat feet and notably wide feet, I’d pass on this shoe. I think you’d have a better look with something like a TriBase Reign 5 over this model even though it “feels” wider.

  • UA Project Rock 6 Thoughts: True to size for most.

UA Project Rock 6 Sizing and Fit Assessment

If you have additional sizing and fit questions about the UA Project Rock 6, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram and I can help you out.

Price Breakdown

For the UA Project Rock 6, you can expect to pay around $160 USD. Compared to prior Project Rock iterations this this is the most expensive model to date.

For general lifting and cross-training, this shoe performs fine so I don’t necessarily have a direct knock on it regarding its price in these verticals, however, that doesn’t take away from the fact that they’re just an expensive model.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 Upper

After you pay tax on these shoes, you’ll be looking at a price point of $170 USD plus which is somewhat of a reach for a general shoe. I don’t think this will be the biggest issue for Project Rock fans because it is a strong model, but for everyone else, I’m hit or miss on them.

The updated features and tech are cool, but you can definitely find stronger-performing shoes if you want something more niche.

For example, I’d go with the UA TriBase Reign 6 if you want a UA shoe for lifting or the Charged Commit 3 if you need something under $100 USD.

UA Project Rock 6

$160

UA Project Rock 6 Product Shot
4.2
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.2
Durability
4.2
Quality
4.3

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • Light Running (1-3 miles)
  • Thicker Midsole Lovers

Falls Short

  • For Budget Shoppers
  • For Minimalist Lovers
  • For Deadlifts

Construction Details

Compared to the UA Project Rock 5, there have been a lot of major construction changes in this shoe. Below are some of the details that I think are worth noting for this model.

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6mm
  • Weight: 15.10 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • UA Close Upper
  • HOVR Midsole
  • Full Rubber Outsole
  • TriBase Tech On Outsole
  • TPU Heel Clips
  • External Heel Tab
  • Non-Gusetted Tongue
  • 7 Core Eyelets

If you have additional questions or need clarification on any of the construction details with this shoe, drop a comment below.

Under Armour Project Rock 6 Outsole

Takeaway Thoughts

The UA Project Rock 6 has been a fairly strong shoe for mixed-modality training. This shoe is what I would describe as a pretty good training shoe that won’t necessarily be best in class for any one vertical.

If you’re a Project Rock fan, then I’m curious how you’ll internalize this model. I would put this shoe as one of my favorite Project Rock shoes to date I just wish their price point was lower.

If you have additional questions about the UA Project Rock 6, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend) and I can answer whatever you have.

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

7 thoughts on “Under Armour Project Rock 6 Review | Worth the Price?”

  1. Im UK size 10.5 on previous Under Armour Hovr trainers. Tried the PR 5 yesterday (10.5) and it came up 1/4 size too small. Maybe due to the aggressive taper of the toe box. Does the PR6 have a similarly aggressive toe box to the PR5? Trying to decide between usual UA size of 10.5 or half size up for PR6. Thanks for advice mate.

    1. Yep! I think they’ll be fine. I’ve deadlifted up to 455 lbs in these and did my reverse lunges at 225 lbs the other week in these and their stability was fine. If you like the 5, then I think you’ll enjoy this model, too. Plus, they have a 6mm heel-to-toe drop which you may like more!

      1. Thanks for your reply,
        I think the appearance of the PR6 is best looking for Project Rcok serie.
        Hope to sell soon at Taiwan~

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