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Home » TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer

I personally test every product featured on That Fit Friend using a regimen of training tests that I’ve developed over years of testing training gear. I buy the gear I test and may earn commissions on sales made through links on my site.

If you’re in the market for cross-training and CrossFit shoes, then you’ve likely seen the TYR CXT-1 Trainer and STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer mentioned as top performers on multiple occasions.

In fact, both of these shoes make my best cross-training shoes list for slightly different reasons. The TYR CXT-1 Trainer delivers a nice level of stability and versatility while the Haze Trainer has a more “minimalist” and articulative construction.

If you’ve been curious about the Haze Trainer versus the TYR CXT-1 Trainer, hopefully, this article helps clear up some of the confusion for you so you can make the better investment per your training needs.

Below, I tried to break down all of the key differences between the CXT-1 Trainer versus the Haze Training regarding their performance, construction, sizing, durability, and price.

Exploring new cross-training shoes? Try my Cross-Training Shoe Finder. I built this calculator to help provide you with shoes to explore that will match your preferences best. 

Read My CXT-1 Trainer and Haze Trainer Reviews

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Deadlifting

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer Performance

To accurately compare the performance of the STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer and TYR CXT-1 Trainer, I think it can be productive to asses how they work in a wide range of contexts.

Below, I’ll cover how the Haze Trainer and CXT-1 Trainer compare for lifting, CrossFit, versatile training, short runs, and daily wear. This way, you can cross-reference which training shoe will match your specific needs best.

Comparing the CXT-1 Trainer Vs Haze Trainer for CrossFit and Lifting

When it comes to lifting and CrossFit, the CXT-1 Trainer, and the Haze Trainer are both strong performers but for slightly different reasons. Both models have a stable construction and their midsole will be denser than versatile-focused training shoes.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Squatting

In both shoes, I’ve comfortably squatted over 405 lbs and deadlifted over 500 lbs, so I don’t think stability or outsole traction will be a concern for most buying these shoes for lifting exclusively. Outside of stability, there are a few nuances to note about each shoe’s lifting performance.

The Haze Trainer’s sole as a whole is a little more mobile than the CXT-1 Trainer’s. You notice this most when doing things like lunges and more dynamic work like jump trap bar deadlifts. I think if you like a little more “ground feel” with your trainer then you’ll enjoy the Haze.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Strength Training

In addition, the Haze Trainer features a 4mm heel-to-toe drop which is a drop similar to the Nike Metcon 8 and older Reebok Nano models. If you’ve worn these models before and enjoyed their drops, then you’ll also resonate with the Haze Trainer’s feel when lifting.

The CXT-1 Trainer features a 9mm heel-to-toe drop which is one of the higher drops for modern-day cross-training shoes. When lifting, you definitely feel like you have more “heel” in this model which can be a good or bad thing depending on your needs.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Functional Fitness

For example, I’m a lankier guy who likes to have a little more heel elevation for things like squats, cleans, wall balls, and thrusters, so if you fall into the camp of enjoying higher drops, then I think you’ll resonate with the CXT-1 Trainer’s heel-to-toe drop.

There’s also a little more arch support in the CXT-1 Trainer while the Haze Trainer has a flatter construction. If you have higher arches and need a little more support, then I think you’ll find the CXT-1 Trainer to feel better for your anatomy.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Durability for CrossFit Training

In the context of CrossFit, both of these shoes do a pretty good job with a few niche areas where they fall short. The CXT-1 Trainer provides a nice blend of stability and versatility for WODs that include heavier strength work and dynamic exercises.

I like how the Surge NRG Foam interacts with the ground when doing things like box jumps, dumbbell snatches, and double-under, it feels lively and responsive. The toe bumper is also nice for additional durability when doing burpees.

Suggest Read: 10 Best CrossFit Shoes | My Top Picks for Wide Feet, Flat Feet, and More

Testing the Haze Trainer for Weight Training

My main complaint with the CXT-1 Trainer for CrossFit is its durability for rope climbs. This model’s midfoot outsole wrap can be prone to ripping and this happened on my first pair and a few athlete’s shoe in the That Fit Friend community. The dense material just doesn’t do the best for high-volume climbing.

The Haze Trainer’s mobility and ground feel are its main perks for CrossFit. This shoe’s more “minimalist” feel is great because you get a bit more ground feedback compared to the CXT-1 Trainer and I think the Haze Trainer will resonate more with CrossFit athletes with flatter feet.

Haze Trainer Durability

My issue with the Haze Trainer’s performance for CrossFit is the durability of its upper around its toe box. In both of the Haze Trainer models, I’ve owned, the jacquard knit has started to rip slightly around the toe box due to stress from training. This started after around 6-8 months of going hard in these shoes.

Winner: For lifting, the Haze Trainer will give you more flexibility and ground feedback, while the CXT-1 Trainer will give you more arch and ankle support with a higher heel-to-toe drop. Both shoes will perform well for lifting, so I’d go with the shoe with your preferred fit.

In the context of CrossFit, the CXT-1 Trainer will give a more “traditional” training shoe feel and it offers a little more support throughout its forefoot, midfoot, and heel. The Haze Trainer has a more sock-like and lightweight feel. Both shoes can suffer from breakdown issues in certain contexts.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Product Shot

TYR CXT-1 Trainer

Pros: Stable, Versatile
Cons: Long-Term Durability
Size/Fit: True to Size/Neutral Width
Offset: 9mm
Lifting Threshold: ~525 lbs
Mileage Threshold: <3 miles
Price: $130
TF2 Rating: 4.6
STRIKE MVMNT Haze Trainer

Haze Trainer

Pros: Stable, Mobile Sole
Cons: Upper Durability
Size/Fit: True to Size/Neutral Width
Offset: 4mm
Lifting Threshold: ~500 lbs
Mileage Threshold: <3 Miles
Price: $150
TF2 Rating: 4.5

Comparing the CXT-1 Trainer Vs Haze Trainer for Versatile Training

For versatile training where you’re doing HIIT, athletic-style work, classes, and things like agility training, both of these shoes work well, but they’ll feel very different with how they support your performance.

The TYR CXT-1 Trainer gives you a little more “shoe” regarding athletic-style training. Essentially, for workouts where you’re blending lifting, jumping, and things like shuttle work or multi-directional work, the CXT-1 Trainer feels a little better, in my opinion.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Versatile Training

This model has a nice level of ankle support for multi-directional work and its midsole is stable enough to support balance when doing single-leg explosive work. If you like shoes that provide more support for this style of training, you’ll like the CXT-1 Trainer.

The Haze Trainer is also good for versatile training, but it’s a model that I think comes with an acquired taste. The Cush50 midsole is responsive, however, its lower stack height and mobile construction may feel like it’s not enough for some athletes.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Versatility

A good example of this would be on WODs and workouts where I’m doing a lot of jump rope or jumping volume after my strength work. In the Haze Trainer, I think you’ll notice foot fatigue a little faster because this shoe has a more minimalist vibe to it.

This isn’t a bad thing by any means and I do like it because it reminds me to build up my feet, but it’s something to note with this shoe. If you’re not used to more minimalist-style shoes or trainers, then you’ll want to keep this in mind when training in the Haze Trainer.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Jump Rope

One complaint that I have with the Haze Trainer for versatile training is that its outsole tread under the toe box can fade if you’re training outdoors a lot. After a few sessions of plyometrics and lateral work outdoors, I’m noticing my outsole fade on one of my models.

Winner: If you want a shoe that delivers a more traditional “athletic” fit and feeling, then I’d suggest going with the TYR CXT-1 Trainer. They provide a nice level of support and work well in a wide range of versatile training settings.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer

$130

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Product Shot
4.6
Stability
4.8
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.3

Best For

  • CrossFit/Cross-Training
  • Recreational Lifting
  • Athletic-Style Workouts
  • Athletes That Like Higher Drops

Falls Short

  • For Minimal Drop Lovers
  • For Athletes That Like “Minimalist-Style” Shoes

Comparing the CXT-1 Trainer Vs Haze Trainer for Short Runs and Daily Wear

For short runs that range from 1-3 miles, both of these shoes can work. If you’re just wanting to know how they’ll work for short runs in WODs, then I don’t think you’ll have issues with either of these shoes.

They both work well for faster runs programmed in WODs that range from 400-800 meter runs despite being more stable cross-training shoes. If you’re needing a training shoe for regular pre and post-workout runs, then the CXT-1 Trainer will feel a little better than the Haze Trainer.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Running

For sprint work, the CXT-1 Trainer feels a little more responsive and if you have a forefoot bias with your running, then I think you’ll enjoy how this shoe feels as a whole. This is one of the few cross-training shoes I really enjoy for short faster runs.

For runs longer than three miles, you’ll want to pass on both of these shoes and find something a little more specific for your running needs. In addition, these will be not the best pairs of training shoes for true hybrid training.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Daily Wear

On a daily wear basis, the Haze Trainer performs really well and it’s one of my favorite trainers for daily wear contexts. The upper in this shoe breathes well for day-to-day wear and its flexible sole gives it a nice articulative feel.

The appearance of the Haze Trainer is also nice because it has a more casual look compared to the CXT-1 Trainer which looks much more like a gym shoe. I’ll regularly wear the Haze Trainer for running errands, traveling, and even wearing in more formal situations.

Winner: The TYR CXT-1 Trainer is a stronger performer for short runs and sprint work, and I think it will deliver a better performance for athletes wanting a shoe for this training ask, while the STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer takes the edge for daily wear.

STRIKE MVMNT Haze Trainer

$150

STRIKE MVMNT Haze Trainer
4.5
Stability
4.7
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.2

Best For

  • Heavy Lifting
  • Cross-Training Workouts
  • Athletic-Focused Sessions
  • Shorter Runs (<3 miles)

Falls Short

  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Custom Orthotics

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer Construction

There are a lot of construction differences between the TYR CXT-1 Trainer and STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer. Both of these shoes deliver proprietary features from each company to boost each model’s performance.

Below, I’m going to break down the key construction details o know about these shoes into different sections. Hopefully, this makes this section a lot more digestible and easy to consume.

Outsole

The outsole construction on the TYR CXT-1 Trainer is built with a full rubber material and the tread pattern varies slightly from the forefoot, midfoot, and heel. When it comes to traction, the CXT-1 Trainer does a good job and seems fairly durable.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Outsole

The Haze Trainer utilizes their proprietary Cross Platform 2 outsole construction and the tread pattern on this model isn’t the most aggressive. In the gym, it goes a good job with traction, but for outdoor training, it can fade a little faster than other models.

Midsole

The midsoles used in both of these models run a little more stable and dense compared to other training shoes. In the TYR CXT-1 Trainer, you’ll get the Surge NRG Foam midsole. This model’s stability and midsole feel similar to the Reebok Nano X but with more responsiveness.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Midsole

As you transition from the midfoot to the heel in the CXT-1 Trainer you also have a rubber material that wraps over the midsole. This feature and material help provide additional midfoot, arch, and ankle support.

In the Haze Trainer, you get the Cush50 Midsole which is fairly dense and highly maneuverable. I really enjoy how this midsole moves with the foot and never feels limiting when it comes to your forefoot and midfoot articulation.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Midsole Construction

Upper

The upper construction of these shoes varies pretty greatly regarding their heaviness and how this translates to each model’s fit. The CXT-1 Trainer is built with an engineered mesh that extends from the forefoot to the midfoot.

The posterior part of the CXT-1 Trainer is heavier and it has synthetic overlays which help contribute to this shoe’s overall ankle support. From a durability point of view, I have yet to have issues in either of my CXT-1 Trainer’s uppers.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Upper Construction

The Haze Trainer is built with a jacquard knit upper that wraps the entirety of this shoe. This material has a nice level of breathability and it gives this model a sock-like fit which is awesome for daily wear and comfort. The Haze Trainer has a subtle toe guard, but the toe box does still struggle with stress rips.

Laces and Tongue

The laces and tongue construction are both pretty solid on the Haze Trainer and CXT-1 Trainer and I haven’t had any security issues with either model. Both models feature gusseted and padded tongues.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Laces and Tongue

The CXT-1 Trainer has five core eyelets with a sixth eyelet for lace-lock and it comes with two pairs of shoelaces. The Haze Trainer also comes with two shoe laces and has six core eyelets. You also get a pocket in the Haze Trainer’s tongue to tuck your laces, which is a feature that I’ve never used, but it is nice having.

Insole

The Haze Trainer and TYR CXT-1 Trainer both have thin foam removable insoles. If you use custom orthotics or inserts, then you may want to opt for the CXT-1 Trainer as it has a little more upper volume.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Insole

The Haze Trainer’s upper around the toe box can feel a little low, which is I don’t typically recommend this model for anyone who plans to use their own insoles and orthotics in these shoes.

Weight and Heel-to-Toe Drop

The weight and heel-to-toe drop in the TYR CXT-1 Trainer and STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer both vary pretty greatly regarding their drops. Their weights are fairly similar and they sit in the middle of the road for cross-training shoe weights.

  • Haze Trainer Weight and Heel-to-Toe Drop: 11.2 oz (size 10 model), 4mm heel-to-toe drop
  • TYR CXT-1 Trainer Weight and Heel-to-Toe Drop: 12.65 oz (size 10 model), 9mm heel-to-toe drop

If you have additional questions about the CXT-1 Trainer versus the Haze Trainer’s constructions, drop a comment below.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer Sizing

For most athletes and lifters, I think you should be safe going true-to-size in both the STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer and TYR CXT-1 Trainer. Both models run true to size regarding length and feature neutral widths to them.

Regarding subtle differences, the CXT-1 Trainer runs a little more narrow throughout and has a slimmer toe box compared to the Haze Trainer. It also has more ankle and arch support compared to the Haze Trainer.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Toe Box Width

The Haze Trainer has a more form-fitting upper construction that feels sock-like and it has a slightly wider toe box. I find the Haze Trainer’s toe box to be a little more anatomical in nature with its fit.

  • Haze Trainer Sizing Thoughts: Go true to size. Wide feet, go up a half-size.
  • TYR CXT-1 Trainer Sizing Thoughts: Go true to size. Wide feet, go up a half-size.

Haze Trainer vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Sizing and Fit

If you have additional sizing and fit questions about the Haze Trainer and CXT-1 Trainer, drop a comment below or check out my individual reviews on these models for more information.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Vs STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer Durability

For lifting and general training, the TYR CXT-1 Trainer and STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer both deliver fairly strong durability. For example, if you’re investing in these for lifting, casual CrossFit, and versatile training, then both shoes should last you a while.

That being said, there are areas where I’ve found the durability of both shoes to fall short, and these areas become more exposed as you get more niche with your training.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Durability

I found the TYR CXT-1 Trainer’s durability starts to fall off when doing rope climbs frequently in my programming. For example, after two weeks of consistent rope climbing, I had the midfoot outsole wrap break on one of my shoes which is not great since it’s a model made for CrossFit.

I know rope climbs are a small portion of most athletes’ programming, but still, to lose a clean chunk of my shoe after just two weeks of j-wrap rope climbing was a little disheartening. In my newer pair, I try to limit their use for rope climbs.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Durability for Rope Climbs

The Haze Trainer’s durability can start to fall off when you’re doing more outdoor training or workouts where you’ll be putting a lot of stress into the shoe’s toe box. For example, in one of my Haze Trainers my toe box ripped after a tough outdoor workout.

In my other model, the toe box started to rip after a plyometric session that included burpees. These are both training contexts that put a lot of stress on the internal and external parts of a shoe’s toe box.

Haze Trainer Upper Long Term Durability

If you have the CXT-1 Trainer and Haze Trainer, have you noticed durability issues with your models, or have they been solid? Share a comment below to help add depth to the durability section around both of these shoes.

Price Comparison and Assessment

For the STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer, you can expect to pay $150 USD. Compared to other training shoes, the Haze Trainer is on the higher end regarding their price point.

With the TYR CXT-1 Trainer, you can expect to pay around $130 USD. The TYR’s price is similar to other premium training shoes like the Nike Metcon 7, Reebok Nano X, and Under Armour TriBase Reign models.

Haze Trainer Vs TYR CXT-1 Trainer Prices

I think the prices of these shoes can both be justified depending on your preferences. For example, if you want something that’s more minimalist that can be worn for daily wear, then the Haze Trainer’s price is a lot easier to swallow.

Conversely, if you like higher drops and want a shoe that’s pretty well-rounded, then the CXT-1 Trainer can be a great option. That being said, if you don’t align perfectly with these shoes and their prices are a turnoff, then you’ll want to explore other shoes. These models can be great, but not worth breaking the bank for.

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Product Shot

TYR CXT-1 Trainer

Pros: Stable, Versatile
Cons: Long-Term Durability
Size/Fit: True to Size/Neutral Width
Offset: 9mm
Lifting Threshold: ~525 lbs
Mileage Threshold: <3 miles
Price: $130
TF2 Rating: 4.6
STRIKE MVMNT Haze Trainer

Haze Trainer

Pros: Stable, Mobile Sole
Cons: Upper Durability
Size/Fit: True to Size/Neutral Width
Offset: 4mm
Lifting Threshold: ~500 lbs
Mileage Threshold: <3 Miles
Price: $150
TF2 Rating: 4.5

Takeaway Thoughts

The TYR CXT-1 Trainer and STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer are both cross-training shoes that continue to grow in popularity. Both of these shoes deliver strong performance for cross-training, CrossFit, and lifting.

I like that the CXT-1 Trainer has a higher drop and delivers a nice level of stability with its patent-pending Stability Platform and Surge NRG Foam midsole.

For days when I want more articulation in my training shoes and want to wear trainers that have a classier look to them, I’ll opt for the Haze Trainer.

While these shoes both perform strongly in the gym, they’re not perfect and there are areas where they fall short, so I’d suggest making sure you recognize their limitations before investing to avoid being let down.

If you have additional questions about the CXT-1 Trainer and Haze Trainer, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

nv-author-image

Jake Boly

I've been in the fitness and strength training industry for nearly a decade. In that time, I've trained hundreds of clients, written thousands of articles, reviewed over 100+ pairs of training shoes, and have produced a large list of training videos. I live and breathe fitness and training gear, and I think it's important that reviewers walk the walk with the gear they're testing. As for my educational background, I have my Masters in Sports Science, Bachelors in Exercise Science, and have my CSCS.

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