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8 Best Shoes for Squats (2024 Update) | Top Picks for Big Squats

Expert Verified By: Austin Current, CSCS, CISSN, Author and Strength Coach

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There’s only one way to test the best shoes for squats — and that’s with a ton of squatting. The building of this list is where my quads, adductors, and glutes earn their keep and rest days.

Whether you’re a casual lifter who simply loves squats and you a shoe optimized for them or a powerlifter looking for your next pair of shoes for squats, this will have you covered.

I’ve squatted over 365 lbs in every pair of shoes below to test stability and I’ve broken my favorite picks into different performance categories. I’ve been a strength coach for 12 years and I also review shoes, and yes, your shoes can influence your squat mechanics.

I kept this in mind when making my picks because when you’re looking for new shoes for squats, you want to consider things like midsole stability, heel-to-toe drop, and upper security. No pair of shoes below is lacking.

The Best Shoes for Squats

AUTHOR’S NOTE: This article was updated in January 2024 to reflect new additions below in my performance categories. On the market for deadlift shoes, too? Check out my favorite deadlift shoes.

Under Armour TriBase Reign 6 Stability Testing

Coach Jake’s Buying Tips

Tip 1 | Do you want flat shoes or heel-elevated shoes?

When finding your perfect pair of shoes for squats, I’d suggest exploring things like the heel-to-toe drop you prefer and the type of squat you’re performing.

For example, some lifters prefer squatting in flat shoes while others like heel elevation. As a strength coach, I like exposing myself to both squat styles to expose myself to different ranges of motion so I squat in flat and heel-elevated shoes based on my squat variation.

If you’re a taller lifter who lacks ankle mobility, then you may find that you like squatting with heel-elevated shoes. For lifters with shorter femurs or good mobility, you may enjoy flat shoes. Both are great and rotating them can be powerful, in my opinion.

Testing the Adidas Powerlift 5 for squats

Tip 2 | Upper security and outsole traction matter, too

Outside of deciding between flat and heel-elevated shoes for squats, you’ll want to also consider your shoe’s outsole and upper. The outsole can be make or break for big squats.

The last thing you want is a shoe that lacks adequate outsole tread. This can lead to slippage issues, especially for squatters who lift on wooden platforms and who like to assume a wider stance.

The upper is important because you don’t want to spill over your shoes when grinding through reps. Ideally, you want your shoe’s upper to lock your feet down so they don’t budget laterally or forward when squatting.

Best Lifting Shoes for Squats

Context: Lfting shoes are a popular shoe choice for tackling heavy squats. There is a lot that goes into weightlifting shoes and how they can manipulate your lifting mechanics especially when it comes to squats.

If you’re in the market for a good pair of lifting shoes primarily for squatting, then check out my two favorite options below. For more niche picks and needs, again, I’d suggest checking out my best weightlifting shoes article.

Top Pick: TYR L-1 Lifter

  • Best For: Weightlifting Athletes, Recreational Lifters, Wider Feet
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 440 lbs
  • Weight: 19.05 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel Height: .83″ (21mm)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. Wide feet, go up a half size.
  • Read My Full Review: TYR L-1 Lifter Review

TYR L1-Lifter

$199.99

TYR L-1 Lifter Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.7
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.3

Best For

  • Weightlifting
  • Squats
  • Recreational Lifting
  • Wider Feet

Falls Short

  • For Narrow Feet
  • For Budget-Conscious Shoppers
  • For Long-Term Sole Durability

The TYR L-1 Lifter is taking my top pick as the best weightlifting shoe for squats. In the context of weightlifting shoes, TYR is relatively new to this shoe category and their model has a few key construction details that earn them my top pick.

Testing the TYR L-1 Lifter Weightlifting Shoes for squats

The first aspect to like about the TYR L-1 Lifter is its toe box construction. TYR’s claim to fame with the L-1 Lifter is that it’s designed to be purposely wide with an anatomical toe box that doesn’t have a harsh taper like traditional weightlifting shoes.

I really enjoy the wider toe box in the TYR L-1 Lifter, especially for squats because it supports toe splay which can then translate to better balance during heavy sets. On heavier sets over 405 lbs, I can sometimes shift forward so the extra toe box width was nice for gripping the floor and adjusting mid-set.

Testing the TYR L-1 Lifter for squats

The final two aspects to like about the TYR L-1 Lifter are its midfoot security and heel construction. This shoe features dual midfoot straps that provide you with a nice locked-down feeling and the TPU heel is plenty stable for even the heaviest squats.

Second Pick: Reebok Legacy Lifter 3

  • Best For: All types of athletes who want a good pair of squat shoes.
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 425 lbs
  • Weight: 23.10 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel Height: .86″ (22mm)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. Wide feet, skip this model.
  • Read My Full Review: Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 Review

Reebok Legacy Lifter III

$220

Reebok Legacy Lifter III Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.4
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Squats
  • Weightlifting
  • Recreational Strength Work
  • Narrow and Neutral-Width Feet

Falls Short

  • For Wide Feet
  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Athletes That Like Lighter Weight Shoes

The Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 has been a consistent weightlifting shoe for squats for me. I’ve competed twice in the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3s and they’ve been exceptional across the board for a few different reasons.

Testing the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 for front squats

First, I enjoy this model’s overall durability and have yet to notice any breakdown issues with this shoe’s upper, outsole, and strap. The Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 somewhat feels like a tank and it should be plenty durable for most lifters

Second, this shoe provides a .86″ heel which is awesome for taller individuals and those with longer legs like me. The slightly more aggressive heel height helps feed better into squat mechanics for taller athletes.

Testing the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 for squats

The third and last reason why I’ve been enjoying the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 is their toe box maneuverability. This model is relatively easy to break in and hugs the foot really well. I do wish there was a little toe spring in them, but overall, this should be a non-issue for most lifters.

Best Training Shoes for Squats

Context: If you’re a recreational lifter, into CrossFit, or want just one pair of workout shoes for all of your training, then you’ve likely considered which cross-training shoes are best for squats. I’m constantly squatting fairly heavily in my training shoes.

There are a few key characteristics that I look for in trainers for squats. First, I assess a training shoe’s stability and how it manages different loads. Second, I’m looking at their versatility and how they perform a variety of exercises while also excelling at squats.

Top Pick: TYR CXT-1 Trainer

  • Best For: All types of athletes who like trainers with higher heel-to-toe drops.
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 425 lbs
  • Weight: 12.95 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 9mm
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. Wide feet, size up a half size.
  • Read My Full Review: TYR CXT-1 Trainer Review

TYR CXT-1 Trainer

$130

TYR CXT-1 Trainer Product Shot
4.3
Stability
4.7
Versatility
4.6
Durability
3.9
Quality
4.1

Best For

  • CrossFit/Cross-Training
  • Recreational Lifting
  • Athletic-Style Workouts
  • Athletes That Like Higher Drops

Falls Short

  • For Minimal Drop Lovers
  • For Athletes That Like “Minimalist-Style” Shoes

The TYR CXT-1 Trainer is taking my top pick as the best cross-training shoe for squats. I like the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for squats specifically for two key squat-related reasons.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Squatting

First, this model comes with a 9mm heel-to-toe drop which is higher than most cross-training shoes. If you like more “heel” when squatting, then I think you’ll enjoy this aspect with the CXT-1 Trainer’s construction.

As a lankier guy, I appreciate a higher heel when it comes to squats, thrusters, and wall balls, which is why I’ll often reach for this model for workouts with more deep hip flexion work. The higher heel doesn’t take away from the shoe’s overall versatility.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Functional Fitness

Second, I like the stability that you get from this shoe’s Stability Platform construction and Surge NRG foam midsole. This model doesn’t compress easily under heavy weight and I feel comfortable squatting over 405 lbs in this model.

Second Pick: Adidas Dropset Trainer 2

  • Best For: Recreational lifters, CrossFit athletes, gym beginners
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 435 lbs
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6mm
  • Weight: 10.45 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Read My ReviewAdidas Dropset Trainer 2 Review

The Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 is a fantastic option for squats and it almost feels like a “traditional” weightlifting shoe at times. This model features a dual-density midsole which makes the forefoot more pliable and the heel more dense.

Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 Review

In the context of squats, this is an awesome feature because you get a lot of ground feedback through the forefoot which has a lower stack height. You shouldn’t experience compression in the Dropset Trainer 2 when squatting over 400 lbs.

This model’s wider toe box is also great for accommodating toe splay and gripping the floor. For my E-width feet, I have plenty of room in this shoe to spread my toes and let my arches do their thing.

Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 Medial Sidewall

I also appreciate the outsole grip that you get in the Dropset Trainer 2. The sticker Traxtion outsole material is awesome for biting different surfaces well like rubber gym floors and wooden platforms.

Best Squat Shoes for Powerlifting

Context: If you’re a powerlifter looking for squat shoes, then you’ll most likely have two concerns. The first is if the shoes align with your squat style. Powerlifters will have specific squat styles and not every shoe and heel-to-toe drop will align with one’s mechanics.

Second, if the shoes are stable enough to accommodate even your heaviest training sessions. If you want a flat pair of shoes f0r squats when powerlifting, then check out my barefoot section below.

Top Pick: Reebok Legacy Lifter 3

  • Best For: All types of athletes who want a good pair of squat shoes.
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 425 lbs
  • Weight: 23.10 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel Height: .86″ (22mm)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. Wide feet, skip this model.
  • Read My Full Review: Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 Review

Reebok Legacy Lifter III

$220

Reebok Legacy Lifter III Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.4
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Squats
  • Weightlifting
  • Recreational Strength Work
  • Narrow and Neutral-Width Feet

Falls Short

  • For Wide Feet
  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Athletes That Like Lighter Weight Shoes

For the first squat shoe for powerlifting, I’m going to discuss one of my favorite weightlifting shoe options, the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3. Not every powerlifter will want an elevated heel when squatting.

Testing the Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 for squats

More specifically, some of my low-bar squatting friends may find that elevated heels conflict with their lifting mechanics while others who have a more hybrid par position like myself that sits between a true “low-bar” and “high-bar” position may want an elevated heel.

The Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 provides an awesome level of stability and its outsole grips the floor well. In the context of powerlifting, I liked how the rubber outsole interacted with the carpet that most powerlifting federations have you squat on. I didn’t have issues with my grip on the carpet which is always a plus.

Reebok Legacy Lifter 3 Review

I also like the deeper boot construction of the Legacy Lifter 3 and how the midfoot strap and Pump system can be easily adjusted for different foot anatomies. If you’re a powerlifter who loves squatting with an elevated heel, then you can’t go wrong with the Legacy Lifter 3.

Second Pick: TYR L-1 Lifter

  • Best For: Weightlifting Athletes, Powerlifters, Recreational Lifters, Wider Feet
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 440 lbs
  • Weight: 19.05 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel Height: .83″ (21mm)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. Wide feet, go up a half size.
  • Read My Full Review: TYR L-1 Lifter Review

TYR L1-Lifter

$199.99

TYR L-1 Lifter Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.7
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.3

Best For

  • Weightlifting
  • Squats
  • Recreational Lifting
  • Wider Feet

Falls Short

  • For Narrow Feet
  • For Budget-Conscious Shoppers
  • For Long-Term Sole Durability

When it comes to squat shoes for powerlifting, you really can’t fault the TYR L-1 Lifter or Reebok Legacy Lifter II. To be honest, either of these weightlifting shoes can fulfill the top pick here as they’re both solid options for powerlifting.

Using the TYR L1-Lifter for Squats

I like the TYR L-1 Lifter for powerlifting due to its “anchor-like” feeling and its wider toe box. This shoe feels stable and secure when you’re squatting in them and the outsole does a great job of laying flat and gripping the floor for different squat styles.

The wider toe box is also a major plus of the TYR L-1 Lifter for powerlifters with wider feet. If you have wide feet or want more toe box room, then I’d suggest passing on the Legacy Lifter II and going with the TYR L-1 Lifter instead.

Nike Romaleos 4 Versus TYR L1-Lifter

My only knock against the TYR L-1 Lifter for powerlifting is that it can run a little hot for longer squat sessions due to its heavier upper construction. However, this shouldn’t be a huge deal for most athletes and you may just need to be more strategic with your sock choice.

Best Barefoot Shoes for Squats

Context: Barefoot shoes have steadily grown in popularity as being awesome shop options for lifting. If you love having a barefoot positioning when squatting, then you’ve likely considered barefoot shoes for squats before.

In all of my barefoot shoe testing, there are a lot of models that excel well for squats, but there are two that stand out to me personally that I always end up reaching for.

Top Pick: Vivobarefoot Primus Lite III

  • Best For: Recreational Lifters and Daily Wear
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 405 lbs
  • Weight: 8.85 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0mm
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size for most. In-between sizing, size up.
  • Read My Full Review: Vivobarefoot Primus Lite III Review

Vivobarefoot Primus Lite III

$160

vivobarefoot primus lite 3
4.8
Stability
4.8
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.8

Best For

  • Heavy Weight Training
  • Daily Wear
  • Casual Workouts
  • Lighter Runs and Athletic Training

Falls Short

  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Longer Barefoot-Style Running Workouts

The Vivobarefoot Primus Lite III is one of my go-to barefoot shoes for tackling squats and general lifting. This model has a few construction features that I really like for lifting and general wear.

vivobarefoot primus lite iii shoe review

For starters, this shoe has a super minimalist outsole construction so you can really feel the ground below your feet when training in these. You can also remove their insole to get even closer to the ground.

So, if you like wearing barefoot shoes on wedges when squatting, you’ll have ample points of contact in this model with your squat style. Additionally, the toe box in this shoe provides a nice width so even wider-footed individuals should have no problem splaying the toes during squats.

Vivobarefoot Primus Lite III for Men

The last aspect to like about this model is that they’re fairly aesthetic and they work really well as daily drivers, too. Not every pair of barefoot shoes has a nice clean appearance, but I think the Primus Lite IIIs do a good job at walking that line of performance and appearance.

Second Pick: AVANCUS Apex Power 1.5

  • Best For: Powerlifters, squatters who have wider stances
  • Heaviest Squat In This Shoe (thus far!): 425 lbs
  • Weight: 11.45 ounces (size 10 model)
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0mm
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to size for most
  • Read MoreAVANCUS Apex Power 1.5 Review

The AVANCUS Apex Power 1.5 can be a fantastic barefoot shoe for squats, especially for lifters who are hyper-focused on powerlifting. This shoe is known for its grippy outsole and how it performs on platforms and competition floors.

AVANCUS Apex Power 1.5 Tread

If you’re a powerlifter and you need a model that will work on carpeted competition floors, then I think you’ll enjoy the bite that you get from this model. Even if you have a wider squat and you’re constantly spreading the floor, this shoe will excel.

The toe box in this model is also plenty wide to accommodate different foot widths. This is great for ensuring your toes can spread and grip the floor when squatting. I have an E-width foot and I have plenty of width in this model’s toe box.

AVANCUS Apex Power 1.5 for Leg Day

The upper security in the Apex Power 1.5 is also great for locking the feet down. There are reinforced synthetic overlays around this shoe which help contribute to this shoe’s security in all squat styles.

Best Budget Squat Shoes

Context: For those on a budget looking for a solid pair of shoes for squatting with a little research, there are a good amount of different squat shoe options that you can go with.

Below, I’m going to provide one budget-friendly shoe that has zero drop construction and one budget-friendly weightlifting shoe. Note, there are other options, too, and if you’re interested in those feel free to reach out and I can suggest more models.

Top Pick: Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star

  • Best For: Recreational Lifters, Budget Shoppers, and Daily Wear
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 430 lbs
  • Weight: 14.3 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0mm
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: Go down a half size.
  • Read My Full Review: Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star Review

Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star

Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star
4.4
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.3
Durability
4.5

Best For

  • Weight Training
  • Beginner Lifters
  • Powerlifting
  • Casual and Daily Wear

Falls Short

  • For Wider Feet
  • For Versatile Training

The Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star is taking my top pick for the best budget squat shoes and shoes for squats. When it comes to a tried and true budget-friendly shoe for heavy lifting, it’s tough to fault the Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star’s performance.

Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star Review

The Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star low-top model comes in at $60 while the high-top model has a price point of $65. Compared to other shoes with comparable stabilities for squats, it’s tough to find consistent shoes that match these prices.

Converse Chuck Taylor All-Stars have been used for lifting, and more specifically squats, for multiple reasons. For starters,  they have a nice level of stability. Their rubber midsole construction doesn’t compress under heavy weight which is great for different strength levels.

Are Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star Good for Lifting

Another perk of the Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star for squats is their outsole grip. Whether you’re squatting on rubber gym floors, wooden platforms, or competition carpets (in powerlifting), you shouldn’t generally experience slip issues in Chuck Taylor All-Stars.

Second Pick: Reebok Lifter PR 3 (Lifting Shoe Option)

  • Best For: Beginners, Budget-Shoppers, Squats, and Weightlifting
  • Heaviest Squat In Them (thus far!): 365 lbs
  • Effective Heel Height: 15mm/.6″
  • Weight: 12.90 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to size (neutral width)
  • Read My Review: Reebok Lifter PR 3 Review

Reebok Lifter PR 3

Reebok Lifter PR 3 Product Shot
4.6
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.5

Best For

  • Squats & Recreational Lifting
  • Beginners to Weightlifting Shoes
  • Beginner Weightlifters
  • Cost-Efficiency

Falls Short

  • For Notably Wide Feet
  • For Those That Need a Higher Heel Height

For those looking for a budget weightlifting shoe for squatting, then the Reebok Lifter PR 3 is a good option to look into. This shoe features a fairly strong construction for the beginner or budget-conscious shopper they’re a fine weightlifting shoe tackling squats.

Reebok Lifter PR 3 Weightlifting Shoe Sizing

The Reebok Lifter PR 3 has a price point of $110 USD and is easily one of the best entry-level weightlifting shoes. This model delivers a lot of key construction features that most will want for squatting for a good price.

This shoe’s TPU heel does a great job of providing stability for heavy sets and if you’re new to weightlifting shoes or a beginner, I think you’ll be plenty fine with this model’s overall stability.

Reebok Lifter PR 3 for Training

I also like the midfoot security that you get with this shoe. The single midfoot strap provides more than enough security to promote a nice “locked-down” feeling and the outsole grips the floor well so you shouldn’t have slip issues in these when squatting. 

What Types of Shoes Are Best for Squatting?

When asking the question, “What shoes are best for squatting?” we should explore the surrounding context of the ask. There are no definitive shoe options when it comes to great shoes for squatting because lifters and athletes will have different needs when seeking out great squat shoes.

In reality, instead of pigeonholing a few different shoes for squatting that may not work for everyone, we should instead focus on the construction characteristics of a shoe that make them great for squatting.

Squatting in regular shoes

Whether you’re a CrossFit athlete, a true beginner, a weightlifter a diehard powerlifter, or a recreational lifter, there are three construction aspects that I always look for when considering different shoes for squatting for different lifters. These three construction traits include:

  1. Stable Midsole and Outsole Construction: This ensures the shoe doesn’t compress under squats which could cause you to lose balance and see a dip in performance.
  2. Adequate Outsole Traction: Good traction on an outsole is a must, especially for heavier sessions. The last thing you want is your shoe sliding from under you when you’re training.
  3. Heel-To-Toe Drop That Aligns With Your Squats: Every shoe’s heel-to-toe drop will be slightly different so exploring different options to see which aligns with your squat patterning can be useful for contextualizing which shoes you should grab for squatting. For example, do you want and prefer an elevated heel, a minimal drop, or a zero drop?

If you use the three construction traits above to guide your shoe selection, then you can’t go wrong with your choice. There is no “one-size-fits-all” squat shoe.

Can Beginners Wear Squat Shoes?

Without creating confusion here, when lifters say “squat shoes” and “lifting shoes” they mean weightlifting shoes. That being said, the topic of beginners wearing squat shoes, AKA weightlifting shoes is a popular topic and there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer here.

I’m going to provide context per what I recommend to a lot of the beginner lifters and athletes that I work with who ask this question. In my coaching opinion, beginners can wear weightlifting shoes especially when they help athletes improve their form.

Testing the Adidas Powerlift 5 for squats

As a beginner, we have an awesome opportunity to build good mechanics and create strong habits. If a weightlifting shoe helps an athlete be more conscious of their and improve their squat mechanics, then weightlifting shoes can be a really useful tool for teaching and creating strong mechanics.

There is no list of minimum requirements for wearing weightlifting shoes. For example, you do not need to be a strength sports athlete or squat a certain amount to benefit from training with an elevated heel.

That being said, explore different foot positions while squatting to see what creates the more positive form outcome for your needs and skill level.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
Which shoes are best for squats?

A:
The best shoes for squats will be dependent on your training needs and squat mechanics, and there's no one-size-fits-all shoe for squats. As a general rule of thumb, the best shoes for squatting will provide a stable construction, a heel-to-toe drop that works for your squat mechanics, and an outsole that grips the floor well.

Q:
Do shoes matter for squats?

A:
Shoes can certainly matter for squats. As you get more niche and serious about your training, your footwear choice can have an impact on your squat mechanics. For example, if you're a strength sports athlete or someone training heavier, then you'll want a pair of shoes that properly support your squat needs.

Q:
Do you need flat shoes for squats?

A:
You don't necessarily need flat shoes for squats. Some lifters like squatting with flat shoes while others enjoy lifting with an elevated heel. Your shoe choice for squats should align with your needs, wants, and goals with your training. A great pair of shoes for squats should be tailored to your individuality.

Takeaway Thoughts

When considering the best shoes for squatting, I’d suggest exploring the context of your overall training and why you want this pair of shoes.

There are a ton of different shoes on the market for squatting and if you can apply the context of training needs when selecting various shoes, then you can make more educated buying decisions.

If you need additional help picking the perfect pair of shoes for squatting for your needs, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

Jake Boly

Jake Boly

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

2 thoughts on “8 Best Shoes for Squats (2024 Update) | Top Picks for Big Squats”

    1. Hey Colin! Most weightlifting shoes would work really well, imo. If you have limited mobility then opting for a shoe with a higher heel could be more useful so models with a .75″ in heel or higher may work better, for example!

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