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7 Best Cross-Training Shoes for Wide Feet In 2024 (Tape Measured)

best training shoes for wide feet in 2024

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As a strength coach and shoe reviewer, I’ve been thrilled to see the training shoe industry shift towards making more wide-feet-friendly shoes. Life is too short to cram a wide foot into a narrow-fitting training shoe.

I’ve tested hundreds of training shoes, and I’m constantly comparing different shoe’s performances and widths. On top of my width tests, I’ve cultivated community feedback from my YouTube channel.

The blend of my tests and my community’s feedback has helped me formulate this wide-feet-friendly list to guide you to the best-fitting shoes for your needs.

Jake, I’m In a Rush: My personal favorite of this list is the Born Primitive Savage 1. This model gives me “old school” CrossFit and cross-training shoe vibes. It has plenty of width in the forefoot for toe splay and performs great for lifting.

Cross-Training Shoes for Wide Feet Buying Guide

Author’s Note: I update this article every quarter to reflect changes in rankings based on new shoes that release. My most recent update has been to cross-training and HIIT section.

How I Tested Shoes for This Guide

At That Fit Friend, I’m the only person reviewing cross-training shoes, and I have been reviewing training shoes for seven years. At this point, I’ve reviewed over 300 pairs of training shoes!

For all of my shoe tests, I use a proprietary system to keep content consistent and better convey nuance and context. Sizing will play a larger role in my testing process in the context of specific sizing asks.

  • Shoe Width: If you have wide feet, I don’t need to tell you that width rules everything. Every shoe receives a measurement with tape for accuracy, and then I cross-reference a shoe’s upper and its fit and feel with other models.
  • Midsole Density: Midsole density dictates a shoe’s stability and versatility. When assessing a shoe’s midsole, I’m specifically looking for thresholds. At what weight does this shoe’s midsole start to compress?
  • Outsole Traction: Grip can make or break workouts. To assess a shoe’s outsole, I’m performing multi-directional exercises on different surfaces to see if model’s slip or if they’ll give you enough bite to confidently train.
  • Upper Durability: Weak uppers lead to weak investments. For upper assessments, I stress test a shoe’s forefoot and midfoot to ensure there’s no splitting of materials. I also do exercises like burpees to check abrasion resistance.

If you have further questions about my testing process or want to see my tests in action, I’d highly suggest checking out my shoe reviews on my YouTube channel!

Best Men’s Pick | Born Primitive Savage 1

  • Good Width For: EE-Width Feet and Below
  • Price: $130
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 11.2 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • Reebok Nano 2.0: Good Alternative

Born Primitive Savage 1

$130

Born Primitive Savage 1 Product Shot
4.8
Stability
4.8
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.8
Quality
4.8

Best For

  • Strength Training
  • CrossFit
  • Cross-Training
  • “Minimalist” Trainer Lovers
  • Wide(r) Feet

Falls Short

  • For Running

Born Primitive Savage 1 Toe Box Width to highlight how they work for wide feet

Show Me the Pros & Cons

Logo

Pros

  • Good durability for CrossFit WODs
  • Wide Toe Box Is Great for Toe Splay
  • Dense Midsole and Lower Stack Height

Cons

  • Not the Best for Running
  • May Be Too Wide for Narrow Feet
  • Lower Material At Midfoot Folds At Times

The Born Primitive Savage 1 is one of those training shoes that grows on you fast. I think that has to do with the fact that they remind me of some of the older Reebok Nanos. I have an E-width foot that works well for my foot width. I never have issues, no matter the sock thickness I’m using.

I also appreciate that the Savage 1’s midfoot isn’t aggressively tapered, so it can be a good option for guys (and women) with flatter feet. For context, compared to other training shoes, the Savage 1 reminds me most of the Reebok Nano 2.o regarding its “flatter” feeling.

The lower stack height in this shoe is also great for “minimalist” lovers. I always find that I get plenty of ground feel in this shoe and I like how much you can connect with the ground in this model when doing things like cleans, snatches, and plyometrics.

Testing the Born Primitive Savage 1 for Deadlifts

In this shoe, I’ve worked up to a 525 lb deadlift and a 395 lb squat, and I have never had issues with stability. I attribute this to this shoe’s denser midsole and lower stack height. I almost think this shoe could be a good bridge between barefoot shoes and training shoes.

My pair is now about 6 months old, and they’re still holding strong in terms of durability. The knit upper and synthetic overlays have been pretty impervious to abrasion from rope climbs and burpees, and I’ve enjoyed this shoe’s consistency for CrossFit.

My Final Verdict: The Born Primitive Savage 1 is a “safe bet” if you need a consistently stable and durable shoe for CrossFit and lifting. They won’t be the most comfortable shoes for running, but they slap for lifting and CrossFit.

Best Wide Feet Training Shoes for CrossFit | Nike Metcon 9

  • Good Width For: EE-Width Feet and Below
  • Price: $150
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 13.25 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • Adi Dropset Trainer 2: Good Alternative

Nike Metcon 9

$150

Nike Metcon 9 Product Shot
4.0
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.0
Durability
4.0
Quality
3.8

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • CrossFit
  • Athletic Focused Training

Falls Short

  • For Running
  • For Overpronators

Nike Metcon 9 Toe Box Width on That Fit Friend

Show Me the Pros & Cons

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Pros

  • Dual-density midsole is great for heavy lifting
  • Wider toe box is awesome for toe splay
  • Upper promotes durability in CrossFit workouts

Cons

  • TPU heel can still feel clunky
  • Not great for running and HIIT
  • Lacks breathability and rope guards can feel bulky

The Metcon 9 has proven to be a pretty consistent training shoe for CrossFit. I’ve enjoyed this shoe’s density for heavier lifting, its durability has been pretty good thus far, and the wider toe box is a big perk and change to this model.

My favorite part of this shoe is its dual-density midsole in this model. It’s softer around the heart of the forefoot and denser around the edges of the shoe. I’ve deadlifted over 515 lbs in this shoe and have done things like 275 lb walking lunges in this shoe with little issues of compression.

Regarding responsiveness, for HIIT training and plyometrics, the Hyperlift heel in this model doesn’t beat you up as much as the Metcon 7, which is nice, giving this model an edge for versatility in CrossFit workouts, too. I still don’t love this feature, but it’s better.

Testing the Nike Metcon 9 for CrossFit

For the most part, I like this model’s reworked upper construction. The increased rope guard and reworked upper materials on this model have proven to promote long-term durability for high-abrasion workouts and exercises. 

That said, for my J-wrap climbing friends, it’s rare, but you can sometimes have some splitting of the rubbers on the outsole if you’re heavy on your feet for a high-volume climbing session. I haven’t had that issue, but some lifters have reported experiencing it.

My Final Verdict: The Metcon 9 isn’t my favorite iteration to date, but I do see its utility for avid CrossFit athletes. It’s consistent and stable, and it has a wider toe box to accommodate a wider range of foot anatomies.

Best Women’s Training Shoes for Wide Feet | Reebok Nano X4

  • Good Width For: E-widths and below (sometimes EE-widths)
  • Price: $140-150 (colorway dependent)
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 7mm
  • Weight: 13.25 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • Haze Trainer: Good Alternative

Reebok Nano X4

$140

Reebok Nano X4 Product Image
4.4
Stability
4.4
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.4
Quality
4.2

Best For

  • Strength Training
  • HIIT and Versatile Workouts
  • Sprints and Short Runs (<2 miles)
  • CrossFit and Functional Fitness

Falls Short

  • For Feet Wider Than EEE-Widths
  • For Runs Longer than 2-3 Miles
  • For Minimalist Lovers

Reebok Nano X4 Toe Box Width

Show Me the Pros & Cons

Logo

Pros

  • Great option for doing a little bit of everything
  • Floatride Energy Foam midsole is stable and responsive
  • Good shoef for short runs/HYROX-style workouts

Cons

  • Can feel bulky for minimalist lovers
  • Arch can feel uncomfortable for flat feet
  • Toe box isn't as wide as older Nano models

The Rationale for the Reebok Nano X4 (Expanded)

The Reebok Nano X4 can be a good well-rounded option for women with wider feet. My community typically reports that the Nano X4 works best with foot anatomies that are around a D to E-widths and sometimes EE widths.

It’s somewhat ironic because Reebok Nanos used to be known for their width but have since started to taper their toe boxes slightly to cater to a larger audience. That said, the newer Nanos do work for a lot of lifters and athletes — they’re just not as wide as they used to be.

In the gym, the Nano X4’s Floatride Energy Foam midsole and Lift and Run Chassis system do a good job of contributing to this shoe’s stability and runnability. This is a model you squat and deadlift heavy in, then run a mile or two and have them feel comfortable.

Reebok Nano X4 Review

The updated features on the Nano X4 are also great for contributing to this shoe’s security and upper breathability. The Nano X3 could feel heavy with a tongue that slides at times, so the lighter-weight Flexweave upper, higher tongue gusset and decreased LAR material are all nice changes.

Pro tip: the Reebok Nano X4 can feel a little snug upon the first few wears. The Flexweave knit does break in after a week or two, so give them a little time to stretch and form-fit to your feet.

The Final Verdict: If you vary your training every week and do things like CrossFit workouts, strength sessions, HIIT/classes, and short runs, then it’s tough to fault the Nano X4’s well-rounded performance.

Best Training Shoes for Wide AND Flat Feet | VIKTOS Core Gym

  • Good Width For: EE-Width Feet and Below (good for high insteps)
  • Price: Upper volume may be too much for narrow and low-volume feet
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 12.8 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • UA TriBase Reign 6: Good Alternative

VIKTOS Core Gym

VIKTOS Core Gym Product Image
4.5
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.3
Durability
4.5
Quality
4.6

Best For

  • heavy strength training
  • thicker and wider feet
  • rigorous cross-training workouts
  • CrossFit and rucking

Falls Short

  • for longer runs
  • for narrow and low-volume feet

VIKTOS Core Gym for Flat Feet

VIKTOS Core Gym Pros and Cons

Logo

Pros

  • Well-rounded performance for lifting and cross-training
  • Nice width for wide and flat feet
  • Great for high insteps and thick feet

Cons

  • High upper volume may not work for low-profile feet
  • They can feel clunky when running
  • Not the best-looking shoe on the market

The VIKTOS Core Gym is a training shoe that typically flies under the radar for most. This model is big within the tactical community, but it’s starting to gain a little popularity in the CrossFit and lifting worlds, and that’s what brought me to buy and review them.

Right out of the box, I noticed the width of this shoe’s toe box and midfoot. With my E-width foot, I had plenty of room for toe splay in this shoe, and the midfoot has a nice flat feeling, which I think will be great for lifters and athletes who don’t want arch support.

Another sizing perk I’ve noticed with the Core Gym is its exceptional upper volume. For high insteps and thick feet, I think this shoe will be great, and you should have PLENTY of room in this model. That said, low-profile feet steer clear of this shoe.

Testing the VIKTOS Core Gym for Deadlifts
Deadlifting 475 lbs for 6 reps in the Core Gym

I like this model’s high-rebound EVA foam midsole. It is stable enough to support 500+ lb deadlifts, and it’s comfortable for cross-training sessions where I was jumping and doing exercises like sled drags and full-body circuits.

I’ve also used my model for countless CrossFit WODs and athletic workouts and enjoyed them. Their upper is durable, and the midsole hasn’t shown any signs of breakdown whatsoever.  They kind of feel like older CrossFit shoes but with more space.

My Final Verdict: If you’re tired of battling low-profile and snugger-fitting training shoes, give the VIKTOS Core Gym a try. They’re not “perfect,” but for my instep friends, I think they’ll work exceptionally well.

Best Wide Feet Training Shoes for HIIT | Inov-8 F-Fly

  • Good Width For: EE-Width Feet and Below
  • Price: $130
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 9.25 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • Altra Solstice XT 2: Good Alternative

Inov-8 F-Fly

Inov-8 F-Fly Product Shot Used for That Fit Friend Review
4.6
Stability
4.3
Versatility
4.8
Durability
4.6
Quality
4.7

Best For

  • HYROX-Style Training
  • Runs From 1-5 Miles
  • Strength Training (best up to 415 lbs and below)
  • Cross-Training Workouts
  • Workout Classes

Falls Short

  • For Narrow Feet
  • For CrossFit WODs With Rope Climbs
  • For Court Sports

Inov-8 F-Fly Toe Box Width

Inov-8 F-Fly

Inov-8 F-Fly Product Shot Used for That Fit Friend Review
4.6
Stability
4.3
Versatility
4.8
Durability
4.6
Quality
4.7

Best For

  • HYROX-Style Training
  • Runs From 1-5 Miles
  • Strength Training (best up to 415 lbs and below)
  • Cross-Training Workouts
  • Workout Classes

Falls Short

  • For Narrow Feet
  • For CrossFit WODs With Rope Climbs
  • For Court Sports

The Inov-8 F-Fly has been a sick shoe for HIIT workouts and versatile sessions where I’m jumping and running a lot. This model is built to be a hybrid-focused training shoe, and I’m always a little skeptical when companies make this claim because the shoe often ends up being mid for both verticals.

In the context of HIIT, I like the POWERFLOW PRO midsole used in this shoe. It gives this model a highly responsive, flexible, and lightweight feeling, all underrated performance attributes for classes and HIIT sessions.

What I appreciate most about this shoe is how well it performs for running and short intervals. An example of a workout that I’ve loved the F-Fly for was my conditioning sessions, where I was doing kettlebell swings, sled drags, and 800-meter treadmill runs.

Using the Inov-8 F-Fly for Free Weights Exercises

Outside of this shoe’s responsive midsole, I’ve also come to love its upper construction. The mesh is comfortable on the foot, and it breathes super well during sessions outdoors in hot temperatures and in warm gyms.

This shoe could use a little more rigidity on the lateral and medial toe box for explosive lateral movements, but that’s honestly my only real knock on this shoe in the gym. They’ve been a surprisingly strong hybrid shoe for my workouts.

My Final Verdict: If you have wide feet and need that lightweight shoe for HIIT and some light runs, the Inov-8 F-Fly will work great. They’re comfortable, lightweight, and have a nice degree of sole flexibility.

Best Wide Feet Training Shoes for High Arches | Adidas Dropset Trainer 2

  • Good Width For: E-widths and below (sometimes EE-widths)
  • Price: $130
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6mm
  • Weight: 9.85 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Want More Info: Read My Review
  • Reebok Nano X4: Good Alternative

Adidas Dropset Trainer 2

$130

Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 Product Shot
4.7
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.8
Durability
4.7
Quality
4.6

Best For

  • Cross-Training
  • CrossFit Workouts
  • Heavier Strength Training
  • Athletic Focused Sessions
  • Wider Feet

Falls Short

  • For Running

Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 Toe Box Width for that fit friend round up

Show Me the Pros & Cons

Logo

Pros

  • Fantastic training shoe for lifting due to its stability and it's well-rounded.
  • Good breathability for hotter gym climates.
  • Ample room in the toe box for toe splay for most foot anatomies.

Cons

  • Not the best shoe on the market for running and hybrid workouts.
  • Arch can feel a little uncomfortable for flat feet.
  • Ventilation in midsole isn't the best for walking in wet climates.

Why I Chose the Dropset Trainer 2 (Expanded)

I’ve loved the Adidas Dropset Trainer 2’s performance for lifting and cross-training and like their blend of feeling wider but having some arch support built into them. I have a regular arch, and these fit my foot like a glove.

The wider anatomical toe box is great for promoting toe splay, and the upper of this shoe breaks in well; after about two weeks, this shoe felt great on my foot, and my community has reported a similar break-in period in this model.

I use my Dropset Trainer 2 most for versatile workouts where I’m blending strength and plyometrics together. For example, if I’m squatting or deadlifting heavily and then doing something like a broad jump or vertical jump, I’ll use my Dropset Trainer 2s.

Testing the Adidas Dropset Trainer 2 for Deadlifts

My favorite feature of this shoe is its dual-density midsole. The midfoot is responsive and pliable, and the midfoot and heel have a denser feeling. These kind of have a weightlifting shoe-like feeling which I think you’ll love if you enjoy training in that type of footwear.

Outside of this shoe’s midsole, I think most athletes will also appreciate the upper and outsole in this model. The outsole has been fantastic grip-wise for lifting and cross-training, and the breathable upper has been great for foot climate in the various settings I’ve used my Dropset 2s.

My Final Verdict: I love the Dropset Trainer 2, and I think you will, too, if you have wider feet and prefer a little arch in your shoes. These shoes are versatile and work for pretty much everything you can throw at them in the gym.

Best Budget Wide-Feet Training Shoes | UA Charged Commit 3

  • Good Width For: EEE-Width Feet and Below
  • Price: $80
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 8mm
  • Weight: 11.54 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: No
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • UA Charged Commit 3: Read My Review
  • Reebok Nanoflex V2: Good Alternative

UA Charged Commit 3

Under Armour Charged Commit 3 Product Shot
4.2
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.3
Durability
4.1
Quality
4.2

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • Gym Beginners
  • Neutral to Wider Feet

Falls Short

  • For Maximal Lifting
  • For CrossFit

UA Charged Commit 3 Toe Box Width

Charged Commit 3 Pros and Cons

Logo

Pros

  • Wide toe box and midfoot
  • Great budget friendly price
  • Responsive midsole with okay stability

Cons

  • Can look and feel clunky at times
  • Not great for low-profile feet
  • Laces run weirdly long

The UA Charged Commit 3 is my top pick as the best budget cross-training shoe for wide feet. Make sure you select the wide option when grabbing these. This model has been a surprisingly strong performer in the gym, and it has a relatively low price point.

When not on sale, the UA Charged Commit 3 costs around $80. For the price, I thought this shoe did a pretty good job of delivering a well-rounded performance in the gym, especially for lifters who like to do a little bit of everything weekly.

This shoe can work well for recreational lifting, and I’ve deadlifted up to 405 lbs in this shoe without any glaring stability issues. The UA Charged midsole does a good job of walking the line between being stable and versatile.

Me Testing the UA Charged Commit 3 for Lifting

This model has also felt pretty good for things like jump rope, sled exercises, and plyometrics. It gives you a nice platform to train on, and it’s plush enough to accommodate most cross-training workouts and HIIT-focused exercises.

I also like that this shoe has a bit more upper volume compared to its peers and is built wide throughout. If you have thicker and wider feet, then I think you’ll resonate with the Charged Commit 3’s fit.

My Final Verdict: If you’re balling on a budget, the Charged Commit 3 (wide) is a great option to go for. It’s well-rounded and often on sale, so you’ll spend well under $100 for them.

My Two Favorite Buying Tips

Buying Tip 1 — Wide Can Vary

Wide feet can vary a lot and every company will classify “wide” differently. For example, a “wide” shoe from Nike will not necessarily be the same as a “wide” shoe from Altra. Trust me, I know this is frustrating.

My best piece of advice for you is to use a Brannock scale at your local shoe store to gain a more exact idea of your foot width. This will make it easier to cross-reference your foot’s width with a company’s sizing scale and with what others have shared in reviews.

Born Primitive Savage 1 Sizing and Fit

Buying Tip 2 — Which Part of the Shoe Needs To Be Wide

Once you’ve assessed your foot’s width, pay attention to where your foot is widest and what types of shoes tend to work best for you. Oftentimes, reviews and companies will make notes about the lasts used for their shoes.

For example, I always assess if a shoe will work for feet that are wider in the forefoot, midfoot, or both. On top of this, I’ve reviewed every shoe mentioned below (which most sites don’t do), so if you’re still at a loss, please reach out!

How to Size Your Shoes

Answer: The ideal cross-training shoe fit will be individual. However, I usually have a range I suggest for most lifters. I recommend leaving anywhere from .2″-.6″ of space at the end of your shoe’s toe box for general cross-training shoes and narrow and neutral foot widths.

For wide feet, I recommend actually working with a slightly larger range and that is to aim to have .4″-.7″ of clearance at the end of your shoe’s toe box.

how should cross-training shoes fit for wide feet

Wider feet will generally require a bit more room in the toe box to accommodate different foot widths and toe splay. By leaving a bit more length in the toe box, we can hedge our bets to ensure we’ll also get a bit more width in our shoes.

This is also why some lifters and athletes will go up a half size in notoriously more narrow-fitting cross-training shoes like Nike Metcons.

Take Home Thoughts

If you have wide feet, then finding a great-fitting pair of cross-training shoes can be pretty frustrating at times. In my opinion, the cross-training shoe world is desperately lacking when it comes to wide-feet-friendly options.

Since not every company designs their cross-training shoes to be wider, it can take a little bit of research to find the best cross-training shoes for wide feet in the context of your training needs.

Hopefully, this article helped provide some insights into a few solid cross-training shoes that work for wide feet in a variety of settings.

If you have additional questions on any of the shoes featured in this article, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally on Instagram (@jake_boly). Cross-training shoe sizing can be a serious pain, so I’ll try to help accordingly for you!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
I have a wide foot, should I size up in my training shoes?

A:
In some cross-training shoe models, you can get away with sizing up and having the shoe fit well if you have a wider foot. Personally, I'd suggest instead looking for models that have last constructions that align better with your foot anatomy as opposed to sizing up to force a shoe to fit.

Q:
How do I know if I have a wide foot?

A:
Generally speaking, every shoe company will have different sizing charts that they use to define what types of feet will fit in certain shoes. Measure your foot with a measuring tape and compare with a sizing chart or use a Brannock sizing scale at your local shoe store.
 
Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

31 thoughts on “7 Best Cross-Training Shoes for Wide Feet In 2024 (Tape Measured)”

  1. I have wide feet, and none of the shoes listed really work… what other options are there for folks with both wide feet and high instep?
    I find 4E widths fit, and the old UA Reign’s used to fit without my foot spilling over the sole.

    I had high hopes for the Born Primitives, but while my foot does fit in the shoe, my foot overflows the sole.. and therefore they aren’t stable for someone like myself.

    1. I’ll be updating this article soon to add in newer picks. I also just published a video on my channel with updated models. Two shoes I’d suggest looking into. The VIKTOS Core Gym and the TriBase Reign 6 with the insole removed. You’ll get more volume with the Reign 6 then.

      Also, wide exists on a spectrum. They may not all work for your feet, but I have a ton of folks on my YouTube channel/other articles with “wider” feet that find these work well. Bummed the BP model didn’t work for ya. Maybe in the Savage 2 they’ll reinforce the lateral upper more!

  2. Hi Jake,

    Looking for a model that is good for wide feet. One foot is a 2E and one is just about 3E (yeah) and I overpronate.

    I am glad I found your site. I am just looking for some help!

    Thank you!
    Roger

  3. G’day Jake, great articles, very thorough.
    Of the shoes listed here and in ‘6 Best Training Shoes for Running and Lifting – Hybrid Models’, did you happen to test their durablitiy when descending a rope climb using a foot lock to control the descent?
    Nothing worse than realising you’ve torched your soles and/or uppers with a friction burn, lol.

    1. Hey, Andy! Feeeeeeel that.

      Not all of the options in that list because some of those shoes aren’t designed for the demands of CrossFit. If you were considering the Nano X3 then you’d be fine using them in that context and the Vimana can be okay if you’re only using them once in a blue moon for climbs. Otherwise, I’d pass on using the other models featured in that list for any form of rope climbs.

  4. The fact you have the nano X3 listed as the best cross trainer for wide feet and it doesn’t even have a wide size offered is insulting and immediately makes me think this entire article is BS
    I’ve tried them on and they in no way shape or form are good for wide feet

    1. Bummed to hear that, bro! A lot of folks find them to be plenty wide for their needs and that’s always the nuance that’s tough with cross-training shoes (and shoes in general) and “wide” feet. Wide exists on a spectrum and with how different companies use diff lasts with their own sizing scales it makes it even tougher to find the perfect shoe size for some folks. For example, if you have a wider end of the forefoot, then I have no doubt you find the Nano X3s snug.

      You may want to check out the Nano 2.0s. They have a truer anatomical last.

      Also, FYI — I literally write below the intro that there are very few — if any — cross-training shoes out atm that are great & designed for notably wide feet, but also, that’s fine if you feel that way. Don’t read the content then, lol.

  5. I have a wide midfoot but narrow heel. Currently trying on both women’s nano x2 and x3. Both feel like they are a bit slippy in the heel even with the laces in the heel lock. I could try lacing tighter but then I feel like it will start squeezing my midfoot, especially after I start working out and my feet swell a little more.

    This might sound silly but could it be my socks? If not, any suggestions on what next to try? I am thinking the Altra solstice x2.

    1. IMO, that’s somewhat normal for some folks in the Nanos as they can run a little stiff out of the box. Question, how much room do you have at the end of your toe box? Do you think it could be an issue with length? Also, if you’re not wanting to rock the Nano X2/X3 and plan to return them I’d suggest going with the Reebok Nano 2.0. I think you’d resonate well with them based on what you shared!

  6. Hey, I just recently started my football workouts and my coach recommended to get workout shoes for squatting and CrossFit. Problem is I have very wide, flat feet. You mentioned to ask more specifically if our feet were too wide, so what would you recommend? Thanks.

  7. I have read many reviews, and bought several shoes without success.
    I wear size 15, sizing up half a size is not an option.
    Reebok nano does not come in 15.
    Nike Metcon and Nobull are too narrow toe box.
    I want to lift and do boot camp, not running.

    Any suggestions

    1. That’s an issue with cross-training shoes in general. The shoes in this round-up are “wide”, but that’s relatively speaking, but no trainer on the market compares to the midfoot/toe box width of something like a minimalist shoe, sadly, and it’s a huge gap in the market that someone needs to fill. Sizing inclusivity for trainers are pretty whack. Just shared a YouTube video for sizing with 20 different trainers and none of them are inherently wide as the maximal width trainers go up to atm is D, so E/EE+ kind of get left out to dry.

  8. Unfortunately many of these sneakers don’t allow for a meatier instep. I tried the Reebok Nano x2 in men’s 7.5D and they were just too tight on the instep. I am a woman and wear a 9E in New Balance Fusion 880v11 and finding sneakers appropriate for my CrossFit training is basically impossible. Thanks for the suggestion here though but did you actually have people with wide feet test these out.

    1. Hey Thea! I’m sorry the Nano X2s didn’t work out for you — honestly, you hit the nail on the head when referencing that it’s nearly impossible. IMO, a lot of these big brands lack inclusivity with their shoes when it comes to specifics like your sizing needs. It’s pretty tough pulling models for this list so I try to do my best to pick options that are “wider” for the product cat due to lacking options.

      In reference to this article, I pull choices based on two criteria, 1) I have a spreadsheet where I have measurements of different models, so I try to pull shoes that air on the “wider” end, granted, “wider” for most CrossFit shoes isn’t really that wide, unfortunately, 2) I have folks in the community share feedback on how a shoe fits and if it aligns with their wider feet. The most common size that folks tends to have when receiving feedback is 2E, which isn’t really hitting the extremes for width. Honestly, I should have you as a correspondent to report on shoes that work for 9E widths because that’s a pretty specific size that is underserved in the CrossFit/Cross-training shoe industry atm.

  9. Hi Jake! Thank you for all the in depth and nuanced content, I’ve been devouring it over the past few days of research.

    Do you think the adidas Dropset has a place on this list? I just got them for daily hiit workouts, and while the initial fit feels like I have something pushing up on my midfoot in-step, I wonder if that’s just normal for a wide foot and what “stability” or “arch support” is supposed to feel like?

    1. Just to clarify, I have a pretty wide and flat foot and wear 2E in the Asics Nimbus line. So I guess I’m trying to understand what my expectations should be from a training shoe that fits well enough, given that 2E width options don’t seem prevalent (especially here in India).

      1. IMO, the Dropset Trainers lack for width through the midfoot, which is why you’re likely feeling that “arch support” in this model if you have a wider/flatter foot. If it’s not unbearable, then these will likely work for you long-term, butttttt if they’re uncomfortable, then it may be worth finding a model that aligns better with your needs. Your trainers shouldn’t feel uncomfortable or like you have to work around their fit!

  10. What would you suggest. Just measured 11 wide. Need for the gym. Some floor stuff and planks and little lifting. Have hammer toe on both feet. Really need support and stability. Was measured for inserts and will have them soon. Thanks

    1. I think the Nano X2 could be a good option! Plus, the upper in this model will have enough volume to accommodate a variety of inserts with different levels of thickness.

  11. Can I ask, of the currently available cross trainers that you’ve tried, what is the absolute widest in the toe box? I usually wear my Prios for heavy lifts, but I wanted a more general purpose trainer. I was looking at the Inov8 G-Lite 300s, but maybe there’s a better option? I have to import them, I think. So, I can’t try them first. Usually, I need at least a 2E.

    Appreciate any feedback. Thx!

    1. Check out the Altra Solstice XT 2 – they’re super wide in the toe box. The F-Lite G 300 is pretty wide, too, but they don’t have as much width as the Altra. I think if you want them primarily as a general trainer as stated and plan to keep the Prio for heavy training, then you should enjoy them!

          1. Had to return the XT 2s. There wasn’t enough volume in the shoe to accommodate my instep. Left gaps between the shoe and the tongue. I have a higher arch, but I don’t usually run into this issue.

            It’s a pity because I really loved them and they seemed wide enough in the toe box, which is rare. You were definitely on the right track. I’ll have to keep looking.

  12. Hey hey! Thanks for reaching out. 1. Updated the Echo and shifted it with the HYLETE Circuit II, I had messed up my notes there and totally forgot that HYLETE doesn’t make the Echo in women’s, so apologies there! Meant to have the Echo for high arches and normal Circuit II for women.

    2. In re: colorways: I believe you’re referencing the Haze Trainer? The Haze Trainer colorway featured in the images is the EZ colorway and the colorway in the card is their general Gray colorway. The shoe featured in the images is the same as the normal “gray” Haze Trainer colorway featured, so I use the gray colorway to represent the shoe across the site as it’s more universal than the more “limited” EZ colorway featured in the review. I also have an all-white colorway, but it doesn’t show up the best in the product cards, so I opted for EZ. I’m always on the fence when pulling colorways that I have multiple of due to imagery conflicts or that are limited drops, so I try to use universal colorways in these cases!

    Thank you for the notes 🙂

    1. Jake,

      I have a wide flat foot almost 0 arch. I am currently wearing the innov-8 Men’s Bare-xf 210 which I like, but I have always been interested in the Nike metcons. I have tried the Nike metcon-8 and they seem to narrow to me, is there a big difference between the metcon 8 and the metcon 9s? Also how does the Born Primitive Savage 1 compare to the innov-8 bare-xf 210 or the innov-8 F-Lite G 300 Men’s?

      Thank you for your time and help.

      1. Go Born Primitive Savage 1. I wouldn’t even waste the time investing in the Metcon 9s. If you can try them on in store then def do it to see if you like them, but if you’re only ordering online then I’d say just go BP. They have a nice minimalist-like feel and a good width. G 300 has a pretty narrow midfoot!

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