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Saucony Freedom Crossport Review | Okay But Not Great

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The Saucony Freedom Crossport is designed to be a hybrid-style training shoe for things like HIIT workouts and short road runs. As more of us train in a hybrid fashion, this shoe intrigued me.

More specifically, I’m constantly looking for the best shoes for lifting and running, so I wanted to know where this shoe excels and where its shortcomings lie. What are this shoe’s training thresholds?

In my Saucony Freedom Crossport review, I’ll cover the pros, and cons, and share context on my experiences training in this shoe.

Quick Take: The Saucony Freedom Crossport was just “okay” in the gym and on the road. It’s a good shoe for casual training if you want a hybrid-style workout shoe, but its fit and lax performance both hold back this shoe’s potential, in my opinion.

Saucony Freedom Crossport

Saucony Freedom Crossport Product Shot
3.5
Stability
3.4
Versatility
3.5
Durability
3.6
Quality
3.3

Best For

  • HIIT Workouts
  • Bodyweight Workouts
  • Class-Style Training
  • Light Strength Work
  • Short Road Runs

Falls Short

  • For Wide Feet
  • For Heavier Strength Training
  • For Long-Distance Runs

Saucony Freedom Crossport Review

Who Should Buy the Saucony Freedom Crossport?

The Saucony Freedom Crossport will be an acquired taste, in my opinion. Below are some scenarios where I think this shoe makes a lot of sense.

1. You Want a “Training” Shoe With a Bias for Running

The Saucony Freedom Crossport will be a good shoe for anyone needing a model for home workouts, HIIT, and light running. This shoe’s scope will be best served in these training verticals.

For HIIT workouts, I like the outsole tread on this shoe and find it does a good job on different surfaces. If you’re doing classes on wooden floors or training on rubber gym mats, then grip shouldn’t be an issue in this model.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Fast Runs

This shoe can work for light strength work, too. If you’re training under 225 lbs with a barbell, for example, this shoe should be plenty fine. Could you train heavier in it? Sure, but the midsole will compress and it will be sub-optimal for most folks and I’ll cover that below.

In the context of running and walking, I also think this shoe should perform well for most. This model’s midsole is plush enough for long walks and for runs around three miles, this shoe should also deliver a responsive and comfortable ride for most.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Lifting

2. You Like a Narrower Fitting Shoe

Another context where I think you’ll like the Saucony Freedom Crossport is for those that love narrower-fitting shoes. If you have a narrow or medium-width foot then I think the fit of the Freedom Crossport will work well for you.

This shoe’s midfoot and toe box are a little narrower in nature while the sole has a nice flare to it. This helps give the foot a “locked down” feeling while having a fairly nice base to train on.

 

In the context of different foot anatomies, I see this as a really good thing for narrow and medium-width feet, but an issue for wide feet, and I’ll discuss that below.

I also feel like this shoe fits similar to other Saucony models regarding its upper volume and width so if you typically vibe with Saucony shoes then the Freedom Crossport should have some familiarity for you.

3. You Want a Neutral Shoe With a Lower Heel-to-Toe Drop

If you love a neutral training shoe that you can transition to running with then I think you’ll resonate with the Freedom Crossport. This model has a little arch which I’ll discuss below but I’d still categorize them as neutral-fitting shoes.

I also think this shoe will hit really well for those that like “lower” heel-to-toe drops with their training and running shoes. A lot of modern-day running shoes, and training shoes at that, have 6mm+ heel-to-toe drops.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Heel To Toe Drop

This shoe has a heel-to-toe drop of 4mm so it keeps this shoe’s drop on the lower end and if you like how models like how the old Nike Metcons (pre Metcon 7) felt on foot, then you’ll like the drop of this shoe.

Who Shouldn’t Buy the Saucony Freedom Crossport?

If you’re on the fence about the Saucony Freedom Crossport then I’d cross-reference your thoughts with some of the scenarios below where I feel like this short will likely fall short.

1. You Have Wide and Flat Feet

The first context where I think the Saucony Freedom Crossport will fall short is for wide and flat feet. I have a medium to slightly wider foot width and this shoe’s toe box kind of bums me out.

Saucony Freedom Crossport for Wide Feet

In this model, I have to wear thin no-show socks to make them better and feel more comfortable which isn’t always ideal when I don’t have those socks available. With thicker socks, my foot width exceeds the comfortable threshold that comes along with this model.

If you have wide and flat feet, I’d pass on this shoe entirely. I don’t think it will be worth your time buying them just to return them because they feel way too snug for your foot anatomy.

2. You Don’t Like Shoes With A Lot of Toe Spring

Another context where you’ll want to pass on the Saucony Freedom Crossport is if you’re not a fan of shoes with a lot of toe spring. This model has a ton of “rock” to it and keeps you forward which can be hit or miss.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Toe Spring

In the context of HIIT workouts where you’re on the toes a lot, this can be a good thing, however, I did find it a little limiting as I transitioned into strength work following things like jumping lunges and pogos.

If you’re wanting a shoe that has a flatter feel to its sole then you’ll want to pass on this. To be honest, I prefer less toe spring in my HIIT-focused shoes because it gives them more range and allows you to create more stability in other training realms.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Pros and Cons

Over the course of my training and testing of the Saucony Freedom Crossport, I have a few pros and cons that I’ve internally noted about this shoe.

Report Card: Get the Quick Facts

Saucony Freedom Crossport

Saucony Freedom Crossport Quick Facts Pros and Cons
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Stack Height: 27mm Heel/23mm Forefoot
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Width: Medium

Pros

  1. If you like a plusher and bouncier shoe for HIIT, home workouts, and light runs then you’ll enjoy this shoe and its PWRRUN PB foam.
  2. For narrower and medium-width feet, this shoe should fit your foot anatomy really well and give you a nice level of upper security when training.
  3. This shoe’s toe spring can be nice for long walks, short-tempo runs, and HIIT workouts.

Cons

  1. For wide and flat feet, you’ll want to probably pass on this shoe. It’s low arch and slimmer toe box can feel a little offputting.
  2. While the toe spring can be good in certain workouts, I find that it takes away from this shoe’s range in the gym as rocks you forward a lot when exercising.
  3. The price point is high for this shoe. At $150 USD, you can find stronger shoes that outperform this model, in my opinion.

If you’ve used this for training and have different pros and cons let me know in the comments below because I’m curious how you’ve liked these shoes.

Performance Assessment

To break down the performance of Saucony Freedom Crossport, I’ll discuss how I thought this performed in a few different training settings. I’ll cover this shoe’s performance for strength training, versatile training, short runs, and daily wear.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Strength Training

For strength training, this shoe performs just okay and it has a pretty clear threshold regarding its stability capabilities. If you’re wanting a model primarily for versatile work with some casual strength work then you should be okay with this shoe.

More specifically, if you’re keeping your loading on a barbell to about 225 lbs or lower then this model can technically work. However, with its beveled heel and toe spring, I found this shoe to lack stability when I was trying to ground the feet.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Strength Training

For example, when tackling a circuit with 70 lb dumbbell snatches I kept finding myself shifting forward onto the toes so I had to adjust my form mid-set which isn’t really ideal.

That said, if you’re doing light accessories or bodyweight exercises, then you’ll be plenty fine in this shoe, but for heavier strength work I’d suggest finding a training shoe built for that.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Versatile Training

For workouts where you’re doing plyometrics, HIIT, and multi-directional work, the Freedom Crossport does a pretty good job. It’s bouncy enough to give you a soft ride in most workout settings.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Versatile Training

If you typically like a “softer” shoe for jumping and explosive work, then the PWRRUN PB foam midsole should hit with your preferences. I personally like a denser midsole because it provides better ground feel, so I tried to keep that in mind when reviewing this model.

I like the outsole tread for versatile training and how it does a good job of providing a nice grip on different surfaces. If you’re training indoors all of the time then I also wouldn’t stress the exposed foam in this shoe.

To add to this, the lack of a full rubber outsole does help keep this shoe’s weight down which I also see as a perk for versatile training. This shoe feels super light on the feet when jumping and doing conditioning which is a nice subtle perk.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for HIIT

One thing that I wish this had but doesn’t for multi-directional work is a little more lateral and medial upper support. I found the upper in this shoe to be hit or miss and beefier sidewalls would be nice for things like skater strides and lateral jumps.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Short Runs and Walking

For short runs and tempo-focused runs, I’ve enjoyed the Saucony Freedom Crossport. I think if you’re wanting this shoe for fast runs, then you’ll resonate with its sole construction.

Since you’re on your forefoot more in this style of running, the toe spring actually feels pretty great in this running context. I also liked how this performed on curved treadmills because its sole felt really natural when running on this style of treadmill.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Running

For long-distance runs, you might want to pass on this shoe and find something that’s a little more specific for this running style. The exposed foam on the outsole of this shoe also worries for high-volume outdoor runs.

For walking, I think most will enjoy the feel of the Freedom Crossport. Its beveled heel and toe spring give it a smooth ride especially when doing purposefully long faster-paced walks.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Walking

My one gripe with this shoe for daily wear, though, is that it’s not a great model for standing all day. For example, I don’t think this would be the best shoe for occupations where you want a cushy shoe for standing due to its excessive rock.

Some of My Training Tests In the Freedom Crossport

My Lifting Experiences With This Shoe

I’d give this shoe a 5.9/10 with the understanding that this shoe isn’t technically designed for lifting. It does an “okay” job with light strength work and it should work for most individuals.

Here are some of the lifting tests I did with them with my thoughts.

  • 75 lb RDLs: Midsole lacked stability.
  • 225 lb deadlifts: Okay, and I’d cap loading here.
  • 45 lb rear-foot elevated split squats: Okay, a lot of rock into the toes.
  • 220 lb leg press: Decent grip but midsole compressed.

My Versatile Training Experiences With This Shoe

For versatile workouts, I’d give this shoe a strong 6.8/10. It has a nice cushy feel to its midsole and it should work in most HIIT sessions where you’re on the toes a lot.

Here are some of the lifting tests I did with them with my thoughts.

  • Jumping Lunge: Comfortable, light, and responsive in the forefoot.
  • Dumbbell snatches: Toe spring pulls you forward.
  • Skater strides: Worked but more upper security would be great.
  • Short runs: Not bad and good for quick bouts.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Sizing and Fit

For most individuals, I think you’ll be safe going true to size in the Saucony Freedom Crossport. This model’s width is what I would describe as medium and its length runs fairly true to size.

I found this shoe to fit okay when wearing thins no-show socks and I have a medium to slightly wider foot width depending on the company and their sizing scale. Also, I have a normal arch and noticed the arch in this shoe.

Testing the Saucony Freedom Crossport for Sizing

If you currently wear Saucony shoes for running or working out, then I’d suggest going with the same size in the Freedom Crossport that you do with your other Saucony shoes.

As mentioned above, if you have flat and wide feet then I’d tread lightly when investing in this shoe. In your specific case, I think trying them in-store will be a major key to ensuring they’ll work for you.

  • Saucony Freedom Crossport Sizing Thoughts: True to size for most.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Sizing and Fit Assessment

If you have additional questions about the Saucony Freedom Crossport, drop a comment below or reach out via Instagram.

Price Breakdown

For the Saucony Freedom Crossport, you can expect to pay around $150 USD when they’re full price. Personally, I find this price point to be high for what this shoe is.

Most HIIT-focused shoes cost around $130 USD and $150 tends to be shoes that have a more premium construction to them. However, I don’t find this shoe to feel that premium.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Outsole Construction

I could understand the price making sense for diehard Saucony fans and for those that have the specific performance asks that this shoe is designed to tackle, but even then, I’d suggest trying to find them on sale.

Plus, there’s exposed foam on the outsole of this shoe so if you’re using them for outdoor running then I could also see long-term durability being a potential issue with this model, which furthers the $150 USD being a little steep for this model.

Saucony Freedom Crossport

Saucony Freedom Crossport Product Shot
3.5
Stability
3.4
Versatility
3.5
Durability
3.6
Quality
3.3

Best For

  • HIIT Workouts
  • Bodyweight Workouts
  • Class-Style Training
  • Light Strength Work
  • Short Road Runs

Falls Short

  • For Wide Feet
  • For Heavier Strength Training
  • For Long-Distance Runs

Construction Details

There are a few unique Saucony construction details with the Freedom Crossport, but for the most part, this shoe’s construction is relatively low-frills.

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Stack Height: 27mm (heel), 23mm (forefoot)
  • Weight: 8.95 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • PWRRUN PB Foam Midsole
  • Rubber Outsole Tread
  • Beveled Heel
  • Mesh Upper
  • Gusseted Tongue
  • TPU Heel Support
  • 5 Core Eyelets With a 6th for Lace-Lock

If you have additional construction questions about the Saucony Freedom Crossport, drop a comment below.

Saucony Freedom Crossport Upper Construction

Takeaway Thoughts

At the end of the day, the Saucony Freedom Crossport is just an “okay” workout shoe. It does an okay job for its designed purpose, but its price and overall features are a little lackluster, in my opinion.

This shoe costs $150 USD and it has a relatively narrow scope where I think it will truly excel and shine. That said, for those that love plusher rides and a lot of toe spring, I could see you love this shoe.

For wide and flat feet, and those that want a HIIT shoe for a little bit of everything, especially strength work, I’d suggest opting for a different shoe.

If you have additional questions about the Saucony Freedom Crossport, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

Jake Boly

Jake Boly

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

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