Home » Adidas Trainer V Review | Best Budget Training Shoe for Lifting?

Adidas Trainer V Review | Best Budget Training Shoe for Lifting?

The Adidas Trainer V is a budget-friendly cross-training shoe designed for tackling different workout settings. As someone always excited to find quality training shoes under $100 USD, I was excited to test this model.

Across the board, the Adidas Trainer V has delivered during most of my lifting and cross-training tests. The Bounce midsole provides a nice amount of stability for lifting, and it feels responsive for athletic and versatile training.

The low-profile upper also breathes well and has a nice level of security with a clean appearance, especially being a budget-friendly training shoe. Despite enjoying this model, there are a couple of cons to note about this shoe which I’ll discuss below.

In my Adidas Trainer V review, I’m going to cover various details to help you decide if this shoe matches your training wants and needs.

 

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Who Should Invest In the Adidas Trainer V?

The Adidas Trainer V is a strong budget-friendly training shoe for recreational lifting and cross-training. This model’s Bounce midsole construction provides a nice amount of stability and responsiveness in different training settings.

The full rubber outsole with forefoot grooves also helps makes this a good budget training shoe for athletic-style training. It grips turf well and has a nice level of maneuverability for the price — which is often not the case for cheaper training shoes.

Adidas Trainer V Review

I also like the snugger fit and feel of the upper construction. It locks the foot down well, and the simplistic design of this shoe keeps its appearance on the low-key but stylish end of the aesthetic spectrum.

That being said, this shoe does have a couple of limitations. For example, if you want a shoe for serious CrossFit, you may want to explore CrossFit-specific shoes. Additionally, the low-profile upper will likely feel limiting for those who need shoes with a high instep.

Adidas Trainer V

$80

Adidas Trainer V Product Shot
4.5
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.5
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • Athletic-Style Training
  • Budget-Friendly Shoppers

Falls Short

  • For Thicker Feet
  • For Serious CrossFit

Adidas Trainer V Pros

Throughout my review process with the Adidas Trainer V, I’ve found multiple pros and things to like with this shoe’s performance and construction.

  1. Good Budget Training Shoe for Lifting
  2. Bounce Midsole and Outsole Are Responsive
  3. Low-Profile Upper Is Secure and Breathable

The first pro that I found with the Adidas Trainer V is that its performance for lifting is solid. Generally, with budget-friendly training shoes, you can expect lifting performance and stability to fall off as the price decreases.

Reviewing the Adidas Trainer V for Lifting

However, I didn’t really find this to be the case with the Adidas Trainer V. This shoe’s stability is pretty good for heavier strength training and I think this model will be a viable option for those needing a shoe for general gym and strength work on a weekly basis.

The outsole also provides a nice level of grip on machines, rubber gym floors, and turf, so if you need a shoe for lifting in different settings, you should enjoy this shoe’s performance.

Adidas Trainer V Midsole Construction

The second thing to like about the Adidas Trainer V is its Bounce midsole and full rubber outsole. Adidas utilizes their Bounce construction and tech in a variety of shoes, and I enjoy this construction feature in the Trainer V.

The midsole in this model has a firmer feel but also provides you with a nice level of responsiveness. I think if you enjoy firmer midsoles for lifting and explosive work in the gym and for athletic-style training, you’ll enjoy this aspect.

Adidas Trainer V Outsole Construction

The full rubber outsole is also a perk in this shoe due to its durability and grip. This model features medial and lateral outsole wraps around the midfoot, which is great for additional durability and support. Plus, as mentioned above, the traction is solid in this shoe.

 The final aspect to like about the Adidas Trainer V is its upper construction. This model is purposely built with a low-profile upper which is designed to provide you with a snugger fit.

Adidas Trainer V Upper Construction

For multi-directional exercises, this is a perk because it gives this shoe a nice level of security. I never felt like I was sliding around in this shoe, and I enjoyed how the knit upper locked me down when moving forward, backward, and laterally.

I also like that this shoe’s upper construction is built with at least 50% recycled material. While I wish this number were higher (hopefully in the next iteration it is), it’s a nice perk for those wanting shoes with more responsibly-sourced materials.

Adidas Trainer V Cons

Across the board, the Adidas Trainer V has been a strong performer. However, there are a couple of cons that I would suggest keeping in mind before investing in this shoe.

  1. Break-In Process Can Be Rough
  2. Not a Great Shoe for Those With High Arches/Insteps

My first complaint and knock against the Adidas Trainer V is their break-in process. This model can be pretty stiff for the first week or two of using them, which is most apparent through the base of the toe box.

Adidas Trainer V Mobility and Stiffness

It took about 4-5 workouts before this shoe felt more mobile, which was great after the fact, but getting there was pretty annoying. In the grand scheme of things, this isn’t the biggest deal.

However, it’s a con that I think is worth noting, so you can go into this shoe expect this. I’ve found that budget-friendly training shoes tend to run stiffer than other models, and this isn’t atypical of the Adidas Trainer V.

Adidas Trainer V Upper Construction and Volume

The second drawback to note with the Adidas Trainer V is that you’ll want to pass on this shoe if you have high arches, high insteps, or flat feet through the forefoot.

While I like the snugger fit of this shoe for certain training settings, this comes with a drawback for particular foot anatomies. This shoe doesn’t feature a removable insole, and with its lower-profile design, I think lifters with high arches and thicker feet may have fit issues with this shoe.

Adidas Trainer V Fit and Sizing

Additionally, and speaking of fit issues, the toe box in this model has a pretty aggressive taper. If you like wider toe boxes in your shoes, you may want to explore other models or size up a half size. I have a neutral-width foot and found this shoe to be pretty snug in the toe box when going true to size.

Performance

To break down the performance of the Adidas Trainer V, I’m going to discuss how this shoe performs in different training settings. I’ll talk about how the Trainer V performs for lifting, versatile training, and shorter runs.

If you’re looking into this shoe and want a full scope of its performance, hopefully, this section can help paint the full picture for you regarding where this shoe excels and falls short.

Adidas Trainer V Performance Overview

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Lifting

In the context of lifting, the Adidas Trainer V has been a surprisingly strong training shoe. When reviewing budget-friendly training shoes, I try to shift my review eye to how models perform to their comparable-priced peers and more high-end training shoes.

When it comes to training shoes with similar price points, I think the Adidas Trainer V is one of the better options for lifting on the market. It’s stable under different loads, and for anyone needing a general gym shoe, it should fit the bill well.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Lifting and Working Out

For barbell exercises, machine work, and accessory movements, the Trainer V provided a nice level of stability. The outsole’s tread and grip are also a nice touch for supporting stability in different lifting settings.

My only gripe with this model for lifting is that they’re not my favorite shoes for barbell deadlifting. They have a bit of toe spring, and with their toe box width, they can feel a little limiting when trying to grip the floor during big pulls.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Lifting Weights

If you’re considering the Adidas Trainer V for CrossFit, I think they’ll work for most WODs and will work best for beginners. They do an okay job for rope climbing, which surprised me, and their blend of stability and versatility was nice for different CrossFit contexts.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Versatile Training

For versatile training, I like the performance of the Adidas Trainer V for three key reasons. First, the firmness of the midsole makes them a nice model for explosive work and plyometrics where you want more ground feedback.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Versatile Training

If you like training explosively with firmer training shoes, I think you’ll enjoy the feeling you get from the Adidas Trainer V’s Bounce midsole. This midsole has a medium to high-density feel to it.

The second thing to like about this shoe for versatile training is their mobility once they’ve been broken in. The outsole’s forefoot grooves give this shoe a nice level of mobility and grip when training on different surfaces.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for HIIT Workouts

Budget training shoes can, at times, lack full rubber outsoles, which tends to tank their performance on surfaces like turf. Similar to comparable models like the Nike MC Trainer and Reebok Nanoflex V2, the Trainer V had no traction issues.

The last aspect to like with the Adidas Trainer V for versatile training is the security you get from this shoe’s upper. When training laterally and doing multi-directional exercises, I never experience foot overhang in this model.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Jump Rope

I think if you want a shoe for blending lifting with HIIT and athletic-style training on a weekly basis, the Adidas Trainer V can do a good job. It’s a shoe that holds its own against more “premium” priced, versatile-focused training shoes.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Short Runs and Daily Wear

If you want to do sprints and short runs that are two miles tops in length, you should be okay doing so in the Adidas Trainer V. It’s not the worst training shoe that I’ve used for running, but it’s certainly not the best.

Its firm construction works well for short explosive bouts of running but gets uncomfortable pretty fast when tackling longer distances. These will not be the best training shoes for running and lifting and fall short as a hybrid model.

Testing the Adidas Trainer V for Daily Wear

For daily wear, the Adidas Trainer V is just okay. Personally, I find their snug upper to get uncomfortable for all-day wear, and this limits their performance for things like long walks.

I think if the upper was built to be a little more spacious, then the Trainer V would do a better job at delivering comfort. That being said, I’d pass on wearing this shoe for daily wear if you like a more cushioned ride.

Adidas Trainer V Sizing

The sizing and fit in the Adidas Trainer V can vary slightly based on your foot anatomy and preferred fit. This shoe’s length runs fairly true, and they have a neutral width.

Adidas Trainer V Sizing and Fit Thoughts

 

I think if you have narrow-width feet or neutral-width feet and enjoy a snugger fit, you should be fine going true to size in this model. They’ll likely feel a little snug when breaking them in but should feel fine after a week or so of using them.

If you have neutral-width feet and want more room in your toe box or wider feet, go up a half size in this model to play it safe. For those needing shoes with more upper volume or anyone using custom orthotics, I’d pass on this model.

  • Adidas Trainer V Sizing Thoughts: True to size or size up a half size based on foot anatomy notes above.

Adidas Trainer V Sizing and Fit

If you have additional sizing and fit questions about the Adidas Trainer V, drop a comment below.

Price Breakdown

For the Adidas Trainer V, you can expect to pay $80 USD. Compared to other training shoes that hover around this price point, I feel like the Trainer V provides a nice amount of value.

Adidas Trainer V Shoe Review

The performance of this shoe is pretty stellar for recreational training, they look good, and their durability seems strong for their price. If you need something consistent that’s under $100 USD, the Trainer V is a good shoe to explore.

That being said, for specific and more serious training asks, I think this shoe’s performance will fall short. In addition, I don’t think this shoe’s fit will align with certain foot anatomies.

Adidas Trainer V

$80

Adidas Trainer V Product Shot
4.5
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.5
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • Cross-Training
  • Athletic-Style Training
  • Budget-Friendly Shoppers

Falls Short

  • For Thicker Feet
  • For Serious CrossFit

Construction Details

The Adidas Trainer V’s construction is relatively simple in nature, and that’s somewhat to be expected based on their price. Below are some of the key construction features to note for this model.

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: N/A for this model
  • Weight: 13.35 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: No
  • Bounce Midsole
  • Flexible Knit Upper
  • Full Rubber Outsole With Forefoot Grooves
  • 6 Core Eyelets (with a 7th for lace-lock)
  • External Heel Tab

If you have additional construction-related questions about the Adidas Trainer V, drop a comment below.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
Can you run in the Adidas Trainer V?

A:
The Adidas Trainer V works for sprints and short runs ranging from 1-2 miles. You'll want to pass on this shoe for runs longer than a few miles as they can get uncomfortable.

Q:
Can you use the Adidas Trainer V for CrossFit?

A:
The Adidas Trainer V can be a viable option for casual CrossFit and CrossFit beginners. It does an okay job for most WODs. However, if you want more durability, you'll want to explore CrossFit-focused shoes.

Q:
Are the Adidas Trainer V true to size?

A:
The Adidas Trainer V will fit true to size for most narrow and neutral-width feet, if you like more room in your toe box or have wide feet, size up a half size.

Q:
Are the Adidas Trainer V good for lifting?

A:
For recreational lifting, the Adidas Trainer V does a pretty good job. The midsole provides a nice level of stability, and if you want to train heavy while on a budget, you should be fine doing so in this shoe.

Takeaway Thoughts

Across the board, the Adidas Trainer V has performed exceptionally throughout all of my tests. This model is stable for heavier weight training, and the Adidas Bounce midsole provides a responsive performance in the gym.

Compared to other training shoes that are priced around $80 USD, I think the Trainer V is one of the stronger options to explore, especially if you want them for lifting.

I don’t think these will be the best training shoes for certain foot anatomies along with those that are super specific with CrossFit and barbell training.

If you have additional questions about the Adidas Trainer V, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

That Fit Friend is a site that is supported by myself (Jake Boly) and its readers. If you purchase products through affiliates links on this site, then I may receive a small commission on the sale. These commissions help keep the lights on here at That Fit Friend so I can continue to create content and they help me purchase new models to review!

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Jake Boly

I've been in the fitness and strength training industry for nearly a decade. In that time, I've trained hundreds of clients, written thousands of articles, reviewed over 100+ pairs of training shoes, and have produced a large list of training videos. I live and breathe fitness and training gear, and I think it's important that reviewers walk the walk with the gear they're testing. As for my educational background, I have my Masters in Sports Science, Bachelors in Exercise Science, and have my CSCS.

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