Skip to content
Home » Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Review | Better But Durability Is Still An Issue

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Review | Better But Durability Is Still An Issue

The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is the fourth model to debut in the popular budget-friendly UA HOVR Rise training shoe line. As a fan of the UA HOVR Rise shoe line, I was excited to put the HOVR Rise 4 to the test.

After being less than thrilled with the UA HOVR Rise 3’s durability, I was curious to see if Under Armour had fixed the issues in the Rise 4. While I like this model for HIIT training and think it’s a step in the right direction, I still have some reservations about this shoe.

For example, I still think lace durability will be an issue with this shoe and I’m not the biggest fan of the midsole durability in this shoe’s forefoot. In all honesty, I have a love-hate relationship with this shoe and have a tough time finding where they fit in the market compared to other cross-training shoes.

In this UA HOVR Rise 4 review, I’m going to break down all of the key details that you should know before investing in this model.

 

Looking for new training shoes? Try my Cross-Training Shoe Finder. This tool matches you with shoes that fit your individual training needs and wants best.

Who Should Invest In the UA HOVR Rise 4?

The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 can be a good training shoe for those needing a versatile model. On a weekly basis, if you’re primarily doing HIIT workouts, class-style training, short runs, and light lifting, then you’ll resonate well with the HOVR Rise 4.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 try on review

The HOVR midsole in this model is responsive and it gives this shoe a nice “lively” feeling while jumping and doing explosive training. I also like the TriBase outsole and how it contributes to this shoe’s stability and grip.

I also think this model will work well for those who like a little arch support in their shoes and enjoy bootie-style constructions. The price point for this model is also pretty fair for what they offer.

UA HOVR Rise 4 review

That being said, while I like the UA HOVR Rise 4 and I think they’ll work for a wide range of lifters and athletes, I still have concerns with this shoe’s long-term durability and fit for flat feet.

UA HOVR Rise 4

$110

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Product Shot
4.3
Stability
4.3
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.1

Best For

  • HIIT Workouts
  • Class-Style Training
  • Light to Moderate Lifting
  • Short Runs
  • Daily Wear/Walking

Falls Short

  • For Heavy Lifting
  • For CrossFit-Style Training
  • For Long-Term Durability

UA HOVR Rise 4 Pros

Throughout my testing and review process with the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4, I’ve found multiple pros to like with this training shoe.

  1. HOVR Midsole Is Responsive for Jumping
  2. TriBase Outsole Is Grippy On Different Surfaces
  3. Good General Training Shoe for HIIT

The first thing to like about the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is the HOVR midsole and its level of responsiveness. This model features two types of midsole foams. There’s an internal HOVR foam and external slightly more stable EVA foam.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 HOVR Midsole and TriBase Outsole

For plyometrics, jump rope, and multi-directional workouts, I really enjoyed how the HOVR midsole interacted with the ground. The UA HOVR Rise 4 feel very springy and if your training involves a lot of jumping and power work, then I think you’ll enjoy their performance.

I also feel as though this model is a bit more mobile through the forefoot and midfoot compared to the HOVR Rise 3, which is odd because their midsole and outsole construction are virtually similar. Whether it’s a placebo or not, I like this aspect.

Testing the UA HOVR Rise 4 for Jump Rope

Another thing to like about the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is its outsole construction. This model features TriBase tech on the outsole and this gives the midfoot a nice stable base to balance on and plant on the ground with.

Regarding performance, I like how the outsole construction performs for indoor workouts slightly more than for outdoor workouts. For indoor sessions, the forefoot grips rubber gym floors and turf really well for things like heavy sled pushes, so I don’t think you’ll experience slip issues with this shoe when training indoors.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Outsole Grip

For outdoor sessions, the outsole is okay and it will work outdoors, but the durability issues with the forefoot midsole still bother me. I’ll discuss this more in detail below in the cons section.

Another subtle thing to like about the outsole construction in the HOVR Rise 4 is the slightly bevelled heel. I like this because it gives this model a bit more comfort and versatility for short runs.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Boot Construction

The last thing to like about the UA HOVR Rise 4 is their performance for HIIT workouts, athletic training, and class-style workouts. For the most part, I think the UA HOVR Rise 4 can be a really strong general training shoe.

Plus, I feel as though the price point is fair for what this model offers with its performance. To be honest, this model is somewhat frustrating regarding its performance. It has so much potential.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 TriBase Outsole Construction

I thought the UA HOVR Rise 1 and HOVR Rise 2 were awesome and the HOVR Rise 3 was a step backwards for this shoe line. The Rise 4 has some promising changes and is better, but there are still durability issues that the 3 had which I’ll touch on below.

UA HOVR Rise 4 Cons

I feel as though the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is a step in the right direction for the UA HOVR Rise training shoe line, but there are still a few cons to note about this shoe.

  1. TPU Eyelet Can Run Into Durability Issues
  2. Midsole Around the Toe Box Lacks Protection
  3. Upper Overlap Occurs When Tightening Laces
  4. Not the Best Option for Flat Feet

The first drawback that I have with the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is the same drawback that I had with the HOVR Rise, HOVR Apex 2, and HOVR Apex 3, and that is the TPU eyelet lacks long-term durability.

UA HOVR Rise 4 Eyelet Durability

In this model, there is one TPU eyelet that serves as the fifth eyelet to lock down the foot. I’ve already experienced some rub with the eyelet and while I do think it’s better made than previous models, I’m not sold the TPU will last for others.

More specifically, if you’re doing a lot of harsh cutting/agility workouts and plan to run in the UA HOVR Rise 4, then this could be an issue that you experience faster than others due to the laces causing excessive friction on the TPU.

UA HOVR Rise 4 Midsole Durability

The second drawback that I have with this model is that still has the midsole and outsole construction around the toe box, which can be very hit or miss. In my UA HOVR Rise 3, I experienced some midsole breakdown around the toe box after training outdoors.

This is due to the outsole not protecting the midsole. The midsole in the HOVR Rise 4 sticks out further than the rubber outsole material, so if you’re cutting a lot of training on concrete, then you may run into midsole durability issues. Outdoor athletes, be warned.

UA HOVR Rise 4 Lacing System

Another drawback that I experienced with the HOVR Rise 4 that won’t impact everyone was the upper overlap at the base of the laces. If you have narrow feet and have to tighten this model a lot, then I could see this bothering you more than someone with wide feet.

The final drawback to note about the UA HOVR Rise 4 is their overall fit and how they can fall short for lifters and athletes with flat feet. If you like training shoes that have more width in the midfoot and less arch, then you’ll want to steer clear of this model.

UA HOVR Rise 4 for Outdoor Training

The medial midfoot of this model has a fairly rigid arch, so flat feet may find this shoe uncomfortable as this could press into their foot. I have a fairly high arch and I found this model pretty comfortable, however, I don’t think this will be the case for flat feet.

Performance

To discuss and break down the performance of the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4, I’m going to talk about how these shoes perform in different contexts. I’ll cover how the HOVR Rise 4 perform for lifting, versatile training, short runs, and daily wear.

This way, if you’re considering these shoes as your next pair, then you can better understand if they’ll fit your individual training needs and wants well.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Performance Overview

Testing the UA HOVR Rise 4 for Lifting

The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 does an okay job for recreational lifting, but it’s not going to be your best for heavy training. If you want an Under Armour training shoe for lifting specifically, then I’d suggest looking into UA TriBase Reign 4.

That being said, the HOVR Rise 4 will work for more light to moderate lifting. I started to notice compression with the HOVR midsole when trap bar deadlifting around 405 lbs and I’d suggest capping your loading to around that threshold in this model.

Testing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for lifting

I think the HOVR Rise 4 will work best for more athletic-style lifting sessions where you’re moving lighter weight fast. In this context, the HOVR midsole and TriBase outsole do a fairly good job.

Outside of its stability lacking for heavier lifts, I’m also not the biggest fan of the sole construction in this shoe. This shoe has a fair amount of toe spring so it can be a little tough to ground the full foot when hitting heavier lower body sessions.

Testing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for Working Out

I think if you plan on investing in the HOVR Rise 4 and plan to lift in them, then it can be wise to make sure you understand their limitations. This shoe will lack if you want them for serious lifting and CrossFit-style training.

Testing the UA HOVR Rise 4 for Versatile Training

The UA HOVR Rise 4 performs well for versatile training and it’s definitely going to be best served in this training context. There are three things that I really enjoy about the HOVR Rise 4 for versatile training and there’s one drawback that I’ve noticed.

The first thing to like is the midsole construction and I discussed this above. This shoe has a nice level of “pop and bounce” to it and when doing different types of HIIT workouts and plyometrics, I didn’t feel beat up when wearing this model.

Testing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for HIIT workouts

The second perk of this model for versatile training is its upper and bootie-style construction. The mesh upper with the 3D print breaths well which makes this model a viable option for training in hotter settings.

This shoe also features a bootie-style construction which can be hit or miss. Personally, I like bootie-style constructions in shoes so I enjoy the snug fit that comes along with this model. If you’re not a fan of bootie constructions, then definitely note this about this shoe.

Testing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for Jumping

The third and final reason why I like this model is the TriBase outsole. This feature gives this model a nice blend of stability and it helps you feel planted when doing single-leg work like skater strides, jumping lunges, and single-leg hops.

My main gripe with this model for versatile training is the TPU eyelet. I think it can wreak havoc on this shoe’s laces and even though Under Armour reworked the TPU and used different laces in this shoe I’m not sold they’re void of breakdown due to friction.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Review

Testing the UA HOVR Rise 4 for Short Runs, Walking, and Daily Wear

For running, the UA HOVR Rise 4 does a pretty good job, especially when compared to other training shoes. If you plan to use this model for runs that range from 1-3 miles, then I think you’ll enjoy the fit and comfort of this model.

For long runs, I’d suggest passing on this model and that’s solely due to durability concerns that I have with this shoe’s laces and forefoot midsole. Regarding sprint work, this shoe is okay and it should work for most recreational sprinters.

Reviewing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for running

When it comes to daily wear, this shoe is okay and there are things to like and things to dislike. For example, this shoe’s comfort is pretty solid and I like its breathability. I think this could be a good model to wear out and about when running errands before the gym. 

They’re also pretty comfortable for walking if you have the foot anatomy that aligns with this shoe’s last construction. More specifically, if you like a bit more arch support and higher drops, then I think you’ll like this shoe for walking.

Reviewing the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 for walking

The things to dislike about this model include its durability on certain surfaces and in different environments. This won’t be the model for rocking on a rainy day. I also think this shoe will be a miss for those with flat feet.

UA HOVR Rise 4 Sizing

For most lifters and athletes, you should be safe going true to size in the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4. This model has a neutral width and the length is what I would describe as true, however, it does run a little long.

To get a little more granular on the sizing, for neutral width and wide feet, go true to size. I wouldn’t size up in this model since they run a bit longer compared to other true-to-size models.

Now, if you have a notably narrow foot and typically have a fair amount of room at the end of your toe box, then you may want to size down a half size in this shoe, but even then, I think this will be a small population that needs to do this.

  • UA HOVR Rise 4 Sizing Thoughts: Go true to size. Notably narrow feet, size down a half size.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Sizing and Fit

If you have additional sizing and fit questions on the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 or how they compare to other training shoes, drop a comment below.

Price Breakdown

For the UA HOVR Rise 4, you can expect to pay $110 USD. If you plan to use this shoe primarily for HIIT workouts, class-style training, short runs, and light lifting, then I think the price point could be worth it for this model.

This model’s construction feels a lot better than the UA HOVR Rise 3 which has a similar price point. For versatile-style training, I like the updates to the UA HOVR Rise 4 and feel as if their price is fair.

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 bootie construction

 

With performance, this shoe does a fairly good job across the board and I’d compare them most closely to the Reebok Speed 22 TR, which is another HIIT-focused shoe with a similar price point and performance.

If you need a training shoe for heavy lifting and CrossFit, then I’d look into other models as this shoe will fall short for these training contexts.

UA HOVR Rise 4

$110

Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 Product Shot
4.3
Stability
4.3
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.1

Best For

  • HIIT Workouts
  • Class-Style Training
  • Light to Moderate Lifting
  • Short Runs
  • Daily Wear/Walking

Falls Short

  • For Heavy Lifting
  • For CrossFit-Style Training
  • For Long-Term Durability

Construction Details

The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 has a few key construction details to note that gives this shoe a more techy feel. Below, I’ve outlined some of the key construction details to know about the UA HOVR Rise 4.

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 8mm
  • Weight: 11.1 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: No
  • HOVR Midsole Foam With EVA Foam
  • TriBase Outsole
  • Bootie-Style Construction
  • External Heel Tab
  • Mesh Upper With 3D Print
  • TPU Midfoot to Heel Wrap
  • 5 Core Eyelets

If you have additional questions on the construction of the UA HOVR Rise 4, drop a comment below and I can answer whatever you have.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
Are the UA HOVR Rise 4 true to size?

A:
The UA HOVR Rise 4 cross-training shoes run true to size. The length of this model fits true and they have a neutral or regular width.

Q:
Are the UA HOVR Rise 4 good for running?

A:
The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 are an okay shoe for tackling 1-3 miles. If you plan to run a few miles pre or post-workout, then you should be fine doing so in the UA HOVR Rise 4.

Q:
Can you lift in the UA HOVR Rise 4?

A:
The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 are an okay shoe for lifting weights. This model will work best for light to moderate lifting and general strength work. It may not be your best option for maxing out barbell lifts.

Q:
Are the UA HOVR Rise 4 good for HIIT?

A:
The Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 can be a good shoe for HIIT workouts and class-style training. The HOVR midsole in this shoe is responsive and the TriBase outsole provides a nice base to perform multi-directional activites with.

Takeaway Thoughts

For me, the Under Armour HOVR Rise 4 is an interesting training shoe. They feel more mobile than the previous model and their lightweight build gives them a nice “bouncy” feel when tackling versatile workouts.

At the end of the day, I want to like this model because I do feel as though the construction updates make this model better than the HOVR Rise 3.

However, there are still things that bother me with the UA HOVR Rise 4. For example, the TPU top eyelet can be prone to durability issues and I still think the outsole and midsole need to be reworked at the toe box.

For those with additional questions on the UA HOVR Rise 4 and their overall performance, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

That Fit Friend is a site that is supported by myself (Jake Boly) and its readers. If you purchase products through affiliates links on this site, then I may receive a small commission on the sale. These commissions help keep the lights on here at That Fit Friend so I can continue to create content and they help me purchase new models to review!

nv-author-image

Jake Boly

I've been in the fitness and strength training industry for nearly a decade. In that time, I've trained hundreds of clients, written thousands of articles, reviewed over 100+ pairs of training shoes, and have produced a large list of training videos. I live and breathe fitness and training gear, and I think it's important that reviewers walk the walk with the gear they're testing. As for my educational background, I have my Masters in Sports Science, Bachelors in Exercise Science, and have my CSCS.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *