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6 Best Training Shoes for Flat Feet (2024 Update)

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If you have flat feet, it can be a serious pain to find a great pair of cross-training shoes that fit well. On top of this, a lot of popular cross-training shoes, like the Nike Metcon 8, have slightly more narrow and neutral lasts, so they can feel cramped for flatter-footed athletes.

Luckily, there are more cross-training shoes on the market than ever — and I’ve tested pretty much all of them — so there are various shoe options for those with flat feet. No longer are the days of trying to fit a square peg into a round hole.

The best part about having more options is that I can get even more specific with cross-training shoes for flat feet and dial in what styles of activities specific pairs work best for.

My Top Cross-Training Shoes for Flat Feet Picks

VIKTOS Core Gym for Flat Feet

Cross-Training Shoe for Flat Feet, CrossFit Dialed

When looking into cross-training shoes for flat feet that work for CrossFit I’m specifically looking for two key performance aspects. First, is the fit of the model and the width of the midfoot and toe box to ensure the shoe actually works for those with flatter feet.

Second, I look into the construction features that help make the model a great CrossFit shoe. Does it have the versatility components, upper durability, and stability features needed for tackling CrossFit workouts?

My Top Pick: UA TriBase Reign 6

The UA TriBase Reign 6 has been a fantastic do-it-all-style cross-training shoe that crushes it for CrossFit, too. This is the first TriBase Reign model where I’ve been like, “Okay, this model slaps across the board.” I feel like UA has finally hit their stride with this shoe line.

Testing the TriBase Reign 6 for HIIT

My biggest callouts for the Reign 6 regarding its performance for CrossFit include its durability, versatility, and flexibility. I have yet to have durability issues in my Reign 6 and I’ve been purposely abusing this model on rope climbs and have had my fair share of clipping my toes on box jumps with them.

Versatility is also a massive perk of this shoe. Despite having a drop-in midsole — which can sometimes be hit or miss — I find that it performs super well regarding comfort and responsiveness for WODs where you’re jumping a lot, and it’s been stable enough to support heavy lifts.

Testing the Under Armour TriBase Reign 6 for Deadlifts

I also like the flexibility of this model’s sole and how well it articulates with the foot when training. This shoe has a minimalist vibe to it, and with a wider toe box and midfoot, it’s a great option for athletes who want a shoe that never feels like it limits the midfoot and arches.

Show Me the Pros & Cons

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Pros

  • The drop-in midsole has given this shoe a much more flexible feeling compared to the thicker Micro G Foam midsoles used in the last five models. If you're feeling spicy, swap the drop-in midsole out for a thinner insole for a super minimal feel.
  • This shoe's upper feels more "athletic" on the foot because it hugs the foot well and feels seamless after the first wear. The internal heel counter helps contribute to the security that you get with this shoe, too.
  • The outsole's tread is awesome and does a phenomenal job of gripping different surfaces. This shoe has been fun to use on turf, rubber gym floors, and wooden platforms. You shouldn't have slip issues in this model.

Cons

  • While I like the drop-in midsole, I'd be remiss to not disclose that drop-in midsoles are an acquired taste. For example, if you don't love models like the PUMA Fuse and Nike Zoom Metcon Turbo 2 then you may not like the Reign 6.
  • If you have high-volume feet and you don't want to swap out the drop-in midsole then you may find that this shoe's fit feels snug on your foot. Thick feet be warned, this shoe may feel snug out of the box.
  • For hybrid workouts, this shoe works for runs under 800 meters but it's not going to be your best bet for tackling workouts where you're running over a mile in a single bout.
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 2mm
  • Weight: 14.2 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • For More Info: Read My Review

UA TriBase Reign 6

$130

UA TriBase Reign 6 Product Image
4.7
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.7
Quality
4.7

Best For

  • Strength Training
  • Athletic Workouts
  • Cross-Training and HIIT
  • CrossFit
  • Sprints and Ploymetrics

Falls Short

  • For Exceptionally Wide Feet (<EE-width)
  • For Runs Over a Mile

Cross-Training Shoes for Flat Feet, Lifting-Focused

If you’re looking for a great cross-training shoe specifically for lifting and you have flatter feet, then one of the biggest that I like to pay attention to is the shoe’s midfoot and toe box width.

When lifting, we’ll want ample width to splay the toes and grip the floor properly, so I’m looking for a stable shoe with ample width to accommodate a flatter foot’s needs.

My Top Pick: STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer

My second pick for flat feet cross-training shoes and CrossFit is the STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer. This model features STR/KE MVMNT’s S2 last which has an anatomical build to it and a width that rivals the Altra Escalante’s width.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Weight Training

For flatter-footed athletes, this model’s toe box will likely fit like a glove in a good way and the midfoot isn’t so aggressive so it shouldn’t feel offputting when lifting or wearing them for daily wear.

Another aspect to like about the Haze Trainer for lifting is that the midsole in this model does a great job of providing stability and a high degree of mobility for things like cleans, lunges, and split squats.

Testing the Haze Trainer for Strength Training

I often describe this shoe as a “pseudo-minimalist” model so if you enjoy that style of shoe, then you’ll like the Haze Trainer. The Haze Trainer almost feels like a barefoot shoe at times with how mobile its sole construction is, which is a good thing for lifters really trying to feel the ground below them as they lift heavy.

Show Me the Pros & Cons

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Pros

  • Great for those who love minimalist-feeling trainers.
  • Casual look and vibe are great for daily wear.
  • Upper breathes well and promotes security while training.

Cons

  • Toe box can rip from tough abrasion.
  • Outsole can fade with high-volume concrete use.
  • High insteps may find these tight.
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 11.2 oz
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Read My ReviewRead My Review

STR/KE MVMNT Haze Trainer

$150

STRIKE MVMNT Haze Trainer
4.4
Stability
4.7
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.0
Quality
4.5

Best For

  • Heavy Lifting
  • Cross-Training Workouts
  • Athletic-Focused Sessions
  • Shorter Runs (<3 miles)

Falls Short

  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Custom Orthotics
  • For Thicker Feet

Cross-Training Shoes for Flat Feet, Running-Focused

If you’re in the market for a new cross-training shoe that can perform well with runs and in the gym, then you’ll want to explore hybrid shoe options as most pure cross-training shoes will fall short of running.

If you’re also wanting to explore other hybrid-focused training shoes, I’d suggest also checking out my best training shoes for lifting and running. Just make sure you note that as specificity increases so can a hybrid shoe’s performance.

My Top Pick: STR/KE MVMNT Vimana Hybrid Runner

My top pick for flatter-footed individuals that want a great hybrid training shoe is the STR/KE MVMNT Vimana Hybrid Runner. This shoe also features STR/KE MVMNT’s S2 last and provides adequate forefoot and midfoot width.

strike mvmnt vimana hybrid runner

Outside of being a slightly model in general this is also one of the few shoes that I think truly excels as a hybrid training shoe. This model has a slight bias in its construction for trail running and road running, but it also works well in the gym.

The Meta Platform outsole provides a nice stable base to run on and the Cush50 EVA/EPE midsole provides a nice blend of stability and versatility. I’ve deadlifted over 455 lbs in this shoe without any stability issues, for example.

STRKE MVMNT Vimana Hybrid Runner for Lifting

This shoe can be a bit more pricey, but I think it’s worth it for the athlete and lifter that wants a true hybrid training shoe for lifting and outdoor running.

Vimana Hybrid Runner Pros and Cons

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Pros

  • This training shoe is good for doing a little bit of everything from indoor gym sessions to outdoor trail runs.
  • The midsole in this shoe has plenty of stability for heavy lifting which gives it an edge over other traditional hybrid shoes.
  • The omnidirectional tread does a good job of promoting grip outdoors and it's not so aggressive to where it takes away from smooth floors in gyms.

Cons

  • The midsole at the forefoot can start to split away after about 12 months of tough use. At least, that's what's happening to mine.
  • If you like super plush hybrid training shoes then you may find this model to run too dense. The density and its feel is a give and take in this shoe.
  • While the tread works great on most surfaces, it's not going to be the MOST aggressive for gnarly trails. Keep that in mind if you want these exclusively for that ask.
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 11.2 oz
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Read My Review: Read My Review

STR/KE MVMNT Vimana Hybrid Runner

$160

strke mvmnt vimana hybrid runner
4.7
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.7
Durability
4.7

Best For

  • Trail Runs (Easy to Semi-Technical Terrain)
  • Short to Mid-Range Road Runs
  • Recreational Training
  • Outdoor Workouts

Falls Short

  • For Cost-Efficiency
  • For Highly Technical Trail Runs

Cross-Training Shoe for Flat Feet, HIIT Dialed

When tackling HIIT workouts, nothing can be more frustrating than dealing with a pair of shoes that are way too tight for your foot’s anatomy. This can make the whole experience uncomfortable and leave your feet with blisters.

My Top Pick: PUMA PWR Nitro Squared

The PUMA PWR Nitro Squared is a strong HIIT-focused shoe for anyone who needs a model for class-style workouts. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed this shoe more than I thought I would, and routinely use them for conditioning circuits and hybrid workouts.

PUMA PWR Nitro Squared Walking Tests and On Feet

Despite being a PUMA shoe — which, let’s be real, has notoriously run pretty snug through the midfoot — this model has a more spacious fit. The upper volume through the forefoot and midfoot have a nice amount of volume and the platform of this shoe is wide enough for my E/EE width feet.

I’ve enjoyed the Nitro foam and how much bounce it has. This shoe took about two weeks to fully break-in, but once I passed that threshold, it started to feel even better for things like interval runs, box jumps, and sled workouts. I think this is due to the foam gaining more flexibility.

Performing Single Leg Squats In the PUMA PWR Nitro Squared

To add to this shoe’s performance for HIIT, the outsole also has a good grip for turf and workouts on wooden floors. They’re a pretty foolproof pair when it comes to traction. For my flat feet friends wanting a shoe for HIIT, I’d highly suggest checking out this model if you want something bouncy with a wider and more built out platform.

Show Me the Pros & Cons

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Pros

  • Nitro Foam midsole is bouncy and responsive.
  • Upper is breathable and lightweight.
  • Great for HIIT, short runs, and classes.

Cons

  • Not the widest toe box in the game.
  • Not ideal for minimalist lovers.
  • Take about 1-2 weeks to break-in.
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 13.85 oz (size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • For More InfoRead My Review

PUMA PWR Nitro Squared

$120

PUMA PWR Nitro Squared
4.5
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.6
Durability
4.4
Quality
4.6

Best For

  • Class Workouts
  • HIIT Sessions
  • Short Runs (<2 miles)
  • Light Lifting
  • Some Walking

Falls Short

  • For Heavy Lifting
  • For CrossFit/Functional Fitness
  • For Long-Distance Runs

Cross-Training Shoes for Flat and Wide Feet

If you’re trying to find that one cross-training shoe that delivers an adequate width to its that is also flat-foot-friendly, then you’ve likely been hard-pressed finding a pair of shoes that fits your specific needs.

To be honest, the cross-training shoe market is pretty underserved when it comes to models that work for exceptionally wide feet, which is something I hope changes over the next few years.

My Top Pick: Altra Solstice XT 2

The Altra Solstice XT 2 is taking my top pick as the best flat-foot cross-training shoe that can work for wide feet. This cross-training shoe has one of the widest toe boxes on the market compared to its peers.

altra solstice xt 2 for crossfit and lifting (1)

On top of its wider toe box, this shoe also doesn’t have a super aggressive midfoot which is great for anyone that wants a midfoot that isn’t super rigid to where it digs into the arch of the foot.

The Altra Solstice XT 2 has a medium-density midsole that works for versatile training settings but can also support heavier sessions as well. When squatting over 335 lbs in this shoe, stability wasn’t a major concern and I liked their width for toe splay.

altra solstice xt 2 for walking running and standing

This shoe also has a zero-drop construction so if you like flatter shoes for working out, then I think you’ll resonate with the Altra Solstice XT 2’s construction. My only issue with the Solstice XT 2 is that the outsole could be more durable for outdoor sessions.

Solstice XT 2 Pros and Cons

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Pros

  • Wide toe box is great for toe splay
  • Medium-density midsole is stable yet responsive
  • Upper has good breathability

Cons

  • Long-term outsole durability is an issue
  • Not great for narrower feet
  • Can look a little clown-like at times
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0mm
  • Weight: 9.5 oz (size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • For More InfoRead My Review

Altra Solstice XT 2

$130

Altra Solstice XT 2
4.1
Stability
4.1
Versatility
4.5
Durability
3.8

Best For

  • Recreational Lifting
  • HIIT Workouts
  • Classes
  • Wide Weet
  • Shorter Runs

Falls Short

  • For Heavy Lifting
  • For CrossFit

Cross-Training Shoes for Thick and Flat Feet

If you have flat and thick puddle stompers, this section is for you. This pick is for my friends who are constantly battling shoes that feel far too low-profile through the midfoot and forefoot.

My Top Pick: VIKTOS Core Gym

The VIKTOS Core Gym has been one of my favorite shoes in the context of models that surprised me with their performance. This shoe routinely flies under the radar despite it providing a seemingly strong performance for lifting, cross-training, CrossFit, you name it.

VIKTOS Core Gym

In the context of my tests and training, I’ve enjoyed this shoe’s stability, versatility, and durability. The medium-density foam midsole has been plenty stable for supporting my heaviest sessions, and to date, I’ve squatted 385 lbs and deadlifts 475 lbs in this model with no stability issues.

Its midsole reminds me of older Reebok Nanos, so it has a denser feeling with a bit of responsiveness. For example, it has enough give and bounce to not feel unbearably uncomfortable for plyometrics and dynamic workouts, which is great for giving this model its versatility.

Testing the VIKTOS Core Gym for Deadlifts
Deadlifting 475 lbs for 6 reps

Regarding durability, I have yet to have issues with the reinforced upper and outsole in this model, so I feel like it should be pretty bombproof for most lifters and athletes. I’ve blasted this shoe with rope climbs in WODs and friction from concrete when playing pickleball and no issues whatsoever.

VIKTOS Core Gym Pros and Cons

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Pros

  • Well-rounded performance for lifting and cross-training
  • Nice width for wide and flat feet
  • Great for high insteps and thick feet

Cons

  • High upper volume may not work for low-profile feet
  • They can feel clunky when running
  • Not the best-looking shoe on the market
  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4mm
  • Weight: 12.4 oz (for my size 10)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Sizing: True to size with a wider more spacious fit
  • For More Info: Read My Review

VIKTOS Core Gym

VIKTOS Core Gym Product Image
4.5
Stability
4.6
Versatility
4.3
Durability
4.5
Quality
4.6

Best For

  • heavy strength training
  • thicker and wider feet
  • rigorous cross-training workouts
  • CrossFit and rucking

Falls Short

  • for longer runs
  • for narrow and low-volume feet

Is Working Out With Flat Feet Bad?

No, it is never bad to work out. If you have flat feet, then it can be beneficial for your specific foot anatomy to train and train hard at that. Everyone’s foot anatomy is slightly different, so the benefits will vary from athlete to athlete.

If you have flat feet and notice that your feet ache or feel tired after workout sessions, it can be a good idea to focus on and improve your foot’s musculature. This can then carry over to your foot’s intrinsic muscles, which help provide it with its structure.

If you look around online, then it doesn’t take long until you see something like “flat feet are bad”. That’s a common misconception, and flat feet are not inherently bad as foot flatness varies greatly between individuals and what that means can also vary.

Testing the UA Flow Dynamic for strength work

For example, there are plenty of elite athletes and lifters that have, by definition, “flat feet” but perform just fine without issues. There’s a lot of individuality that comes into play here and adopting the mindset of “this is bad” can be limiting and create issues where there are none, in my coaching opinion.

My biggest piece of advice is to listen to your body when it comes to working out with flatter feet and ease into your style of training accordingly. Then add accessories as needed based on the feedback your body gives you from training.

This way you can better scale your workouts so you’re not feeling beat up after them and you can assess if you should spend some extra time training the feet directly.

Why Are CrossFit Shoes Flat?

Not all CrossFit shoes are flat and very few models actually provide a 0mm heel-to-toe drop or fully flat construction. Most models feature heel-to-toe drops that range from 2mm to 9mm. This range is used to provide the shoe with a “best of all worlds” type of feel.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Functional Fitness

A shoe’s heel-to-toe drop can influence how a shoe fits, feels and performs. If we raise our heel higher above our toe, then we’ll see mechanical changes at the ankle and foot when working out.

The 2mm-9mm heel-to-toe drop range that most CrossFit shoes utilize is to provide the shoes with a lower-to-the-ground feel, but also provides some heel for training purposes when doing things like squats, cleans, wall balls, and thrusters.

Do Flat Feet Lifters Need Arch Support?

Not necessarily. This question depends on the level of midfoot and arch support you need to train and work out without discomfort. If you have flatter feet that are more rigid in nature, then you may not need a ton of arch support when lifting.

Basically, if your feet have adequate musculature and your arch is flatter but strong, then you may not require auxiliary midfoot support.

Testing the TYR CXT-1 Trainer for Daily Wear

For lifters that find their feet collapsing or as though they’re not as stable and balanced when training and note that it’s taking away from their performance, then exploring additional arch support could be a really good call.

This could be provided through a shoe’s last and construction or additional orthotics designed to provide additional arch support. Note, if you reach for additional arch support in shoes, it’s also a good idea to train your foot outside of that shoe to build up the deeper muscles of the foot.

Takeaway Thoughts

If you have flat feet, then it can be a tedious process trying to find a pair of cross-training shoes that fit your performance needs best. There are plenty of cross-training shoes on the market that can work for flat feet and each model will feel differently based on your individual needs.

The cross-training shoes for flat feet featured in this article should all work for flat feet and they each provide their own unique fit and feel in regard to stability and versatility per the demands of your training.

If you have any questions on this round-up and the shoes featured in it, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

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