Home » Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Review (2022) | Great Lifting Shoe On a Budget?

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Review (2022) | Great Lifting Shoe On a Budget?

Over the years, the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes have remained relatively unchanged in their design. Their creation was initially inspired and curated by the late and great Olympic weightlifting coach, Glenn Pendlay.

This is why when searching for the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, you’ll often see older sites refer to them as Pendlay Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes. As a fan of Pendlay and the Do-Win shoe line, I was excited to put this model to the test.

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes have a consistent performance which makes them a good option for a wide range of lifters. Plus, they have a budget-friendly price point which is great for beginners wanting weightlifting shoes

In my Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes review, I’ll cover various topics to help you decide if these shoes are a good fit for your needs.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Review

Who Should Invest In the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes?

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are a solid choice for beginners, recreational lifters, and athletes that want a good shoe for a budget-friendly price. There is a variety of lifting populations that I feel would resonate well with this model.

The plastic midfoot and heel in this model provide this shoe with a nice level of stability for heavy squats, clean & jerks, and other exercises. Additionally, the dual-strap system on the midfoot of this shoe comes with a nice level of security.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoe Review

This model also has an effective heel height of .75″ which will resonate with a wide range of lifters and they’re a pretty durable shoe. For $105 USD, the performance and construction of the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are solid for budget-conscious shoppers.

My only complaints with this model are that the insole’s construction could be a little better and this model runs hot due to its leather upper. Outside of these two complaints, this shoe performs well.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes

$105

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.5
Versatility
4.4
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Squats (All Strength Levels)
  • Weightlifting
  • Weightlifting Shoe Beginners
  • Accessory Exercises Where You Want a Wedge

Falls Short

  • For Breathability
  • For Sizing and Fit (Per Rogue’s Recommendations)

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Pros

Over the course of my training and reviewing process with the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, I’ve found multiple things to like about this model.

  1. Strong Performer for the Price, Beginner-Friendly
  2. Good Heel Stability and Outsole Grip
  3. Midfoot Security Is Solid

The first aspect to like about the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes is their well-rounded performance. This model works well for squats, clean & jerks, snatches, and other accessories where you’re wanting a wedge such as quad-biased leg presses.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Performance Review

More specifically, I like this model’s performance because I feel as though it’s a good intro weightlifting shoe and a good pick for those who are recreational in nature with their training. If you need a shoe for lower body days once or twice a week, this is a strong model.

On top of their consistent performance, the price of this shoe is pretty fair for what they have to offer. This model comes in at $105 USD on Rogue Fitness’s site but is often on sale for $95 USD. For less than $100, they’re a great weightlifting shoe.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Lifting

The second aspect to like about the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes is their heel and outsole construction. Some budget-friendly weightlifting shoes skimp out on these details which can hinder their overall performance and long-term durability.

For example, the Nordic Lifting Powerlifting Shoes utilize a sub-par EVA foam heel and that model’s outsole lacks traction due to it not utilizing a grippier rubber. I like the TPU/plastic wedge Do-Win uses in this model and the rubber outsole has a good level of traction.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Outsole Construction

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced lifter moving a lot of weight, this model should be plenty stable for your needs, and the outsole, once broken in, grips rubber gym floors, wooden platforms, and machines well.

The final aspect to like about this model is the midfoot security that you get with this shoe. This model utilizes a double-strap system with longer velcro straps which is nice for allowing you to create the level of security that you prefer.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Midfoot and Strap Construction

For example, it’s nice being able to have two straps to adjust to create shoe security during different training contexts. The lacing system is also solid which helps contribute to the “locked-down” feeling that you get with this model. I’d suggest tucking your laces under the straps when training.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Cons

Across the board, I’ve enjoyed training in the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes. However, there are a few cons to note about this model before investing in them.

  1. Their Sizing Can Be All Over the Place
  2. Upper Can Run Pretty Hot
  3. Insole Construction and Material Could Be Better

My first con with the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes is their sizing. On Rogue Fitness’s site, they recommend going down a half size for the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, but I think that’s off for the latest iteration.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing Recommendations

In prior models, this shoe did typically run a little long and wide, but in the latest iteration, I think going true to size is the better call for most lifters and athletes. I’m not sure if Do-Win recently changed the last construction of this model, but it fits differently than the pair I had five years ago.

I have this as a con because ordering the wrong size per a site’s recommendations, then having to return them can be a frustrating process. My advice, hedge your bets and go true to size in this model, and don’t size down as Rogue Fitness’s site says.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Fit and Try On Review

The second drawback with this shoe is that it’s not the most breathable so it can run a little hot at times. This shoe features a leather upper construction which is great for durability, but it causes the breathability to take a hit.

The toe box and the midfoot and heel all have leather overlays, so if you’re lifting in longer sessions or hotter gyms, then be forewarned that this shoe will run a little warm compared to other weightlifting shoes that utilize more mesh in their upper.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Upper Construction

The final drawback with the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes is their insole construction, and this very well may be something that only bothers me with these shoes. However, the insole in this model could be better from a grip and durability standpoint.

I was noticing during the break-in phase with this model that the insole was pretty slippery which caused me to then tighten the straps a ton to prevent sliding while cleaning. This didn’t cause heel slip or decrease performance, but it wasn’t my favorite feeling.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Insole Construction

Additionally, the insoles already started showing some signs of wear, which is helping with the grip, ironically, but this does worry me regarding their long-term durability. I’m hoping the wear I’m seeing is just a little fraying from the initial usage of these shoes.

Performance

To cover the performance of the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, I’m going to break down how they perform in different training contexts. I’ll discuss how this performs for squats, weightlifting, and accessory exercises.

This way, if you’re thinking about investing in the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, you can better understand if this shoe fits your individual training needs appropriately.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Performance Overview

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Squats

For squats, I’ve enjoyed the performance of the Do-Win Weighlifting Shoes. This model’s stability is great and when working up to 405 lbs with this model, I didn’t have issues with compression whatsoever.

I also enjoy the outsole’s ability to grip the floor and help me feel locked in. I can have the tendency to turn my feet during heavier high-bar squats due to a lack of a little internal rotation (something I’m constantly working on!), and these shoes were great for helping me feel secure and locked in.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Squats

The heavier upper and dual midfoot straps were also a nice touch for promoting this locked-in feeling. My only gripe with this model for squats was during the acclimation period with these shoes.

With this model, there’s a bit of toe spring out of the box so you can feel “forward” at times with this shoe. For example, during my first heavier session with this model, I had to really focus on driving my toes into the ground to prevent that tipping forward feeling.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Leg Day

Once broken in, this seems to subside, but it’s definitely worth keeping an eye on as you adjust to these shoes and their fit. Overall though, I could see these being a great option for those wanting a shoe for squats once or twice a week.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Weightlifting

For weightlifting, the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes do a pretty good job. Once you break these in, they deliver all of the aspects that you want from weightlifting shoes regarding performance including good stability and security.

The effective heel height of .75″ is also a good middle ground for most lifters and athletes, so if this is your first pair of weightlifting shoes for weightlifting, I think you’ll enjoy the heel that you get with this model.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Weightlifting

I do have a few gripes with this model for the context of weightlifting, though. My first issue is the forward feeling when breaking this shoe in. I found this to be pretty frustrating during my first two weightlifting sessions with this model. I had to be super conscious of this during those workouts.

Second, the insole can be a little slippery upon break-in as well. When moving my feet to catch weight in my cleans, I was noticing that my feet were sliding a little bit, so I had to crank the straps pretty tight, which did help, but it was still annoying for my first sessions.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Cleans

Third and lastly, the lack of breathability in this shoe leaves them feeling pretty hot. If you’re training in a hotter gym, you’ll likely notice your feet running pretty warm in this model, so I’d suggest using lighter and more breathable socks for this context.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Recreational Lifting

If you’re like me and wear weightlifting shoes here and there for certain lower body exercises and machine work, then I think you’ll enjoy this shoe’s ability to perform in these contexts.

It works well on machines when it comes to grip and it’s mobile enough for most lower body exercises. It isn’t as mobile in the toe box as something like the Inov-8 Fastlift Power G 380, but it still does a good job.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes for Lower Body Days

If you’re a lifter who wants this shoe for squats and accessories a few times a week, once again, I think you’ll appreciate this shoe’s construction and performance for its budget-friendly price.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing

The sizing and fit with the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes can vary. Personally, I think most lifters and athletes should go true to size in this weightlifting shoe.

On Rogue Fitness’s site, they suggest going down a half size. I think most lifters and athletes will find this model snug if they go down a half size. In fact, a lot of reviews on their site share the same sentiment.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing for Different Feet

I think this shoe’s last construction has been updated recently because this shoe feels different than the pair I had five years ago. This model now fits true and has a neutral width compared to priorly running a little long and being wider in the toe box.

  • Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing Thoughts: Go true to size.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing and Fit

If you have additional Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes sizing and fit questions or how they fit compared to other models, drop a comment below. 

Price Breakdown

For the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, you can expect to pay around $105 USD. What’s nice about this model is that they’re on sale for $95 USD pretty often on Rogue Fitness’s site.

Compared to other weightlifting shoes that have similar price points like the Reebok Lifter PR II, I think the Do-Win Weightlifting shoes are well worth the investment.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Effective Heel Height

This model should last you a while if you take good care of them, and if you can get them on sale, then they’re definitely one of the strongest weightlifting shoes for under $100 USD.

Their quality isn’t the absolute best on the market, and if you want a shoe that is more premium, then I’d suggest exploring the Nike Romaleos 4 or Reebok Legacy Lifter II. However, as a budget-friendly shoe, this model’s price is fair.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes

$105

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Product Shot
4.4
Stability
4.5
Versatility
4.4
Durability
4.4

Best For

  • Squats (All Strength Levels)
  • Weightlifting
  • Weightlifting Shoe Beginners
  • Accessory Exercises Where You Want a Wedge

Falls Short

  • For Breathability
  • For Sizing and Fit (Per Rogue’s Recommendations)

Construction Details

The construction of the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes has remained relatively unchanged over the last five years, and that’s been one of the nicer things to appreciate with this shoe.

  • Effective Heel Height: .75″
  • Weight: 18.85 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Leather Upper Overlays (toe, midfoot, and heel)
  • Nylon Mesh Midfoot Upper
  • Plastic Heel and Wedge
  • Full Rubber Outsole
  • Durable Velcro Strap System
  • 6 Core Eyelets

If you have additional construction questions on the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, drop a comment below.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
What is the effective heel height of the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes?

A:
The effective heel height of the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes sits at .75 inches. This is a fairly standard heel height compared to other weightlifting shoes.

Q:
Are the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes good for squats?

A:
The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are good shoes for tackling heavy squats. Their plastic heel is stable and doesn't compress under heavy weight and the full rubber outsole grips gym floors well.

Takeaway Thoughts

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are what I would describe as a “tried and true” weightlifting shoe. This model has remained relatively unchanged over the last few years and that’s one of the best things about it.

Essentially, when you invest in the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, you’re getting a simplistic and no-frills shoe. This model’s stability is solid and it has good midfoot security.

My gripes with this include the fact that I think Rogue should update the sizing info for this latest model and the upper can run pretty hot.

If you have additional questions on the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

That Fit Friend is a site that is supported by myself (Jake Boly) and its readers. If you purchase products through affiliates links on this site, then I may receive a small commission on the sale. These commissions help keep the lights on here at That Fit Friend so I can continue to create content and they help me purchase new models to review!

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Jake Boly

I've been in the fitness and strength training industry for nearly a decade. In that time, I've trained hundreds of clients, written thousands of articles, reviewed over 100+ pairs of training shoes, and have produced a large list of training videos. I live and breathe fitness and training gear, and I think it's important that reviewers walk the walk with the gear they're testing. As for my educational background, I have my Masters in Sports Science, Bachelors in Exercise Science, and have my CSCS.

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