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Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer Review

The Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer is the second training-focused shoe to debut from Flux Footwear. This shoe delivers a high-top construction with a flexible adaptive sole.

After reviewing the Flux Footwear Adapt and finding them interesting, I was excited to put the Adapt High-Top Trainer to the test. Plus, I love high-top training shoes so if you’re similar, then you’ve likely considered this model, too, for your workouts. 

Overall, I feel the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer delivers a fairly well-rounded performance, and I see it as a good transitional shoe to using barefoot shoes more frequently for working out. Granted, there are a few cons to note with this shoe and I’ll cover them below.

 

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Who Should Invest In the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer?

The Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer can be a suitable option for the athlete and lifter that wants a high-top training shoe for a little bit of everything. This shoe’s construction and performance are a little more generalist in nature.

On top of this, the sole of the Adapt High-Top Trainer has a nice level of flexibility to it which other high-top models can typically lack. For example, this shoe has more articulation than other models that lifters normally train in like a NOBULL High-Top Trainer and Vans Sk8-Hi.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for Lifting

I also think the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer can be a suitable option for the lifter and athlete that wants to transition into using minimalist shoes for their training. This model walks a fine line between being minimalist and still giving you some cushion.

For lifting, versatile training, and even some functional fitness, the Adapt High-Top Trainer has done a fairly good job across the board. There’s enough stability to train pretty heavy in this shoe and its outsole has a good level of grip for different surfaces.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Outsole

I also think this shoe will be best for those with narrow and neutral-width feet, so if you have that type of foot anatomy and you’re considering this shoe, then I think you’ll vibe really well with this shoe’s overall fit.

Who Shouldn’t Invest In the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer?

The Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer is an okay shoe, however, it definitely has areas where it falls short. For example, the Adapt High-Top Trainer isn’t going to be the best training shoe for those with wide feet. 

This shoe runs fairly narrow and I find its toe box to be a little snug regarding its upper volume as well. I think if you regularly feel limited in your training shoes and you’re looking for a minimalist shoe with width, then you’ll want to pass on this model.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Width

In addition, this model isn’t necessarily my favorite training shoe for heavier barbell work and CrossFit-focused training. While they can work in those contexts, I think there are stronger shoes on the market for a similar price point of $139.99 USD.

Lastly, I’m not convinced that the insole construction will resonate with everyone that wants to wear this shoe for daily wear. The bumpier texture can be hit or miss and if you want a smooth insole for guaranteed comfort, you may also want to skip this model.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer

$139.99

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Product Shot
4.1
Stability
4.2
Versatility
4.1
Durability
4.1

Best For

  • Narrow/Neutral-Width Feet
  • Recreational Lifting
  • Casual Cross-Training
  • Daily Wear and Walking

Falls Short

  • For Wide Feet
  • For CrossFit
  • For Heavier Lifting

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Pros

Across all of my training and wear testing with the Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer, I found a few pros and things to enjoy with this model.

  1. Good Intro to Minimalist Shoes
  2. Decent High-Top Model for General Training
  3. Sole Is Flexible and Mobile

The first thing to like about the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer is that I see it as a good shoe to serve as an intro to minimalist shoes. If you’re brand new to barefoot shoes, then you’ll want to acclimate to this style of footwear at a progressive speed.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer

The Adapt High-Top Trainer has a slightly thicker sole and insole than traditional barefoot shoes that boast stack heights of around 5-7mm. If you want a little more cushion while working towards more minimalist footwear this shoe can be a good option.

I also like that this shoe has a zero-drop construction and an insole that provides a good level of cushion for most contexts. Granted, the insole (AdaptSol technology) can be a little hit or miss for some and I’ll elaborate on that below.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Versatility

Another thing to like about the Adapt High-Top Trainer is that I see them as a good generalist high-top shoe for training. More specifically, this shoe is a good high-top shoe for working out when you need a model for a little bit of everything.

This shoe has enough stability with its minimalist sole construction to work for things like moderate to heavy deadlifts, and it’s mobile for versatile training. Plus, it’s not as heavy as other high-top shoes that athletes and lifters traditionally train in.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Comfort

For example, the Adapt High-Top Trainer’s sole has more flexibility than something like the Vans Sk8-Hi and it doesn’t run nearly as warm as a NOBULL High-Top Trainer.

The final thing to like about the Adapt High-Top Trainer is that if you want a training shoe with a flexible sole, then you should resonate with this model. This shoe’s sole bends and flexes well with the foot and gives you a nice level of ground feedback.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Sole Flexibility

In addition, the outsole tread does a pretty good job of giving you a nice level of traction on different surfaces. Whether you’re training on turf, rubber gym floors, or wooden floors, you shouldn’t have too many grip issues with this model.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Cons

While the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer has been a pretty strong-performing shoe, there are a few cons that come along with this shoe.

  1. Not That Wide of a Shoe
  2. Insole Is Hit Or Miss
  3. Sizing Can Be Tough

The first drawback that I have with the Adapt High-Top Trainer is that despite the Flux Footwear’s site saying this model has a wide toe box, I found them to be pretty limiting regarding overall width.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Toe Box Width

This shoe’s toe box is far from what a traditional barefoot shoe delivers when it comes to the overall width and I think if you have wide feet you’ll want to pass on this shoe. I have a neutral-width foot and with socks on this model feels really snug and without socks, they’re still snug

In my opinion, if you want a transitional minimalist shoe that delivers some cushion, then something like the Lems Primal Zen could be a great option as they’re wide like traditional barefoot shoes but still deliver some cushion and protection.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Sole Construction

Another drawback that I have with the Adapt High-Top Trainer is that its AdaptSol can be hit or miss and I mentioned this above. More specifically, the insole of this shoe has a bumpy texture which feels okay for certain occasions but is a miss for others.

For example, I don’t really mind the textured insole when walking and doing casual training, but I found it pretty offputting when doing things like heavier deadlifts. Plus, I found myself sliding a little bit when gripping the floor, and I think this was due to the layering of the material of this shoe’s insole.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer AdaptSol

If you invest in this shoe, then I’d suggest taking note that this model’s insole isn’t smooth like a traditional shoe and there will be an acclimation and adjustment period to how this shoe feels on the foot.

The final drawback that I have with this shoe is that this model’s sizing, like the Flux Footwear Adapt, is a little off. For context, Flux Footwear’s site says this model fits true to size, but I’m not exactly sold that’s the best move for most lifters and athletes.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer

This model runs pretty short and I should have sized up at least a half-size when accounting for its narrower width, then you’re left with a super snug-fitting shoe that is almost impossible to wear for long periods with socks on.

On their site, they mention that this shoe will stretch, but if your model is already running super snug, then I don’t think it’s going to stretch enough to truly give you enough space. Instead, I’d suggest sizing up a half to full size with this model to avoid exchanges.

Performance Assessment

To break down the performance of the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer, I’ll cover how these shoes perform in a few key performance categories. I’ll discuss how they perform for lifting, versatile training, and daily wear.

If you’re thinking about investing in this shoe, it’s a good idea to understand where they’ll perform best so you can cross-reference their performance with your needs.

Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer Performance Breakdown

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for Lifting

For lifting and strength training, the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer does an okay job in the gym. I think if you’re wanting a model for light to moderate strength sessions, then the Adapt High-Top Trainer will work just fine.

For example, if you want a more minimalist-feeling shoe for routine barbell lifts, machine work, and accessories, then the Adapt High-Top Trainer can be a good option to explore.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for strength training

In addition, I could also see the Adapt High-Top Trainer working for anyone that wants a high-top shoe for this style of work that is a little less thick and heavy than a Vans and more articulative than a Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star.

That being said, there are some drawbacks that come along with this shoe for lifting. The first is the slide you can experience with the insole construction. For higher rep deadlift sets and lower body exercises where my feet god sweaty, I found I slid a bit in this shoe.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for weight training

In addition, the narrow toe box is a major knock on this shoe’s potential in the gym. If you want more room to splay the toes and grip the floor, I think you’ll find this shoe limiting and be let down by its width.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for Versatile Training

For versatile training contexts, the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer is just okay. It can work for some casual cross-training and HIIT workouts, but it’s not necessarily my go-to for these training contexts.

I like how the sole feels on the ground and AdaptTread is pretty grippy, so from an articulation and traction point of view, the Adapt High-Top Trainer delivers on most surfaces.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for versatile training

I think my gripes with this shoe for versatile training revolve around its narrow width and insole. The narrower toe box limits this shoe’s comfort for multi-directional work where you’ll be heavier on the forefoot.

On the topic of this shoe’s insole, there’s a little slide with it which was a turnoff for me when doing more advanced plyometrics like broad jumps. For lower-threshold plyometrics, these work, but I’d tread lightly if you want these for high-threshold work.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for HIIT

Again, if you invest in this shoe, I’d make sure you understand that they can work for versatile training, but there are stronger options on the market and I think this shoe’s performance can fall short for wider feet and high-threshold versatile sessions.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for Daily Wear

When it comes to daily wear, the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer does a pretty good job. There are three reasons why I’ve enjoyed the Adapt High-Top Trainer for daily wear contexts.

First, the sole flexibility and cushion of this shoe are great for allowing the foot to move and do its thing while giving you some protection. For longer walks, the sole of this model provides a fairly comfortable ride.

Testing the Flux Footwear Adapt High-Top Trainer for walking

Second, the ripstop upper is light enough to keep this model breathable in warmer daily wear settings, especially if you’re wearing these sockless. These shoes should be decent all-season shoes.

Third and lastly, the Flux AdaptSol’s bumpier texture can feel pretty nice for certain day-to-day uses. It’s not my favorite for training, however, for casual wear, it can feel kind of nice to give you variety.

Testing the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for daily wear

For short runs, I haven’t tested this shoe so I can’t speak to their performance there. I’m not a fan of running in high-top shoes and with this model’s narrow toe box, I passed on them for this use.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Sizing

For the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer, I think the sizing is going to be highly variable based on your foot anatomy. For example, Flux notes that this shoe fits true to size, but I don’t think that’s going to be the case for everyone.

If you have narrow feet, then you may be the one population that can go true to size in the Adapt High-Top Trainer without limitations, but for everyone else, I think sizing up will be the call.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Width

For example, for neutral-width feet, I think sizing up will be a safe call to ensure you have enough room in this model when wearing them without and with socks.

For wide feet, I’d suggest passing on this shoe entirely as I think their toe box and upper volume will be limiting for your anatomical needs. Lastly, if you’re in-between sizes and have a narrow or neutral-width foot, then sizing up is the best call.

  • Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Sizing Thoughts: True to size for narrow feet, everyone else should size up, in my opinion.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Sizing and Fit Assessment

If you have additional questions on the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer’s sizing and fit, drop a comment below and I can help you out accordingly.

Price Breakdown

For the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer, you can expect to pay $139.99 USD. I think if you’re looking for a high-top shoe that is a little more minimalist for training then this price point can make sense.

Plus, there aren’t a ton of performance-focused “minimalist” shoes on the market that tackle the construction specificity and niche performance that this shoe is built for.

Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer Upper Construction

Now that being said, I do find the overall price of this shoe to be high for anyone not wanting them for very specific reasons. With their average performance in the gym, I think you could find better-performing shoes for the same price if not less.

On top of this, if you have wider feet, then you’ll also want to save your money and invest in a shoe that will deliver a better fit and last construction for your specific foot anatomy.

Construction Details

The Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer’s construction is fairly simple but it does have a few proprietary features to note. Below are some of the key construction details to note about this shoe.

  • Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0mm
  • Weight: 10.15 oz (for my size 10 model)
  • Removable Insole: No Removable Insole, AdaptSol Tech
  • Ripstop Upper
  • Synthetic Toe and Heel Overlays
  • AdaptTread Outsole
  • AdaptSol Insole
  • Padded Tongue
  • 8 Core Eyelets

If you have additional questions about the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer’s construction, drop a comment below.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q:
Do the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer fit true to size?

A:
The Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer runs fairly narrow and a little short regarding their length. If you have narrow-width feet, then you should be fine going true to size, but for neutral-width feet, I'd size up and for wide feet, I'd pass.

Q:
Are the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer good for lifting?

A:
The Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer can be an okay option for lifting if you want a minimalist-feeling shoe for training. This shoe works best for moderate strength sessions but falls short for heavier and more serious lifting.

Q:
Can you use the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer for CrossFit?

A:
The Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer can work for CrossFit workouts, however, you may want to explore options that are a little more specific with their construction if you want a shoe that's more well-rounded for this training ask.

Takeaway Thoughts

At the end of the day, I think the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer delivers a pretty good performance in the gym and for daily wear. I also think there will be a population that really resonates with this shoe.

For example, if you want a high-top shoe for training that has a flexible sole and a minimalist feel, then I think you’ll be someone who really enjoys the Adapt High-Top Trainer.

That being said, I do think there are areas where this shoe falls short. For example, it’s not going to be the best option for wide feet and certain training settings.

If you have additional questions about the Flux Adapt High-Top Trainer, drop a comment below or reach out to me personally via Instagram (@jake_boly or @that_fit_friend).

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly, CSCS, MS Sports Science

Jake Boly is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of That Fit Friend. He's often regarded to as a go-to resource in various performance shoe communities. He’s been formally reviewing shoes and training gear for over 7 years and has hand-tested over 400 pairs of shoes. Jake is known on the internet and YouTube for blending his review process with his educational, strength sports, and personal training background.

Jake has a Masters in Sports Science, a Bachelors in Exercise Science, a CSCS, and he's been personal training for over 10 years helping hundreds of clients get stronger, lose weight, and accomplish their goals. He uses his exercise science brain and personal training background to make curated and thoughtful review content on the fitness gear he's testing.

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